Skip to Main content Open mobile menu Close mobile menu
Blog
  1. Talking with touch

    Nadine Sarter is pioneering the use of tactile interfaces to build better conversations between machines and humans

    The post Talking with touch appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

  2. U-M researchers provide control software to ensure autonomous vehicles stay in their lane

    The team was awarded a Best New Application Paper Award by the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society for their work developing reliable control systems for Lane Keeping and Adaptive Cruise Control.

  3. New browser strategy game has players tackle real-life bat catastrophe

    As a fungal infection ravages bat populations, the new game hopes to promote public awareness of ongoing research to combat the issue.

  4. Year of growth, experiments for May Mobility

    May Mobility intends to gradually acclimate the public to the experience of autonomous driving.

  5. Prof. Kamal Sarabandi welcomes Emperor and Empress of Japan at IGARSS 2019

    Predicting future disasters is an important goal of those participating in the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium

  6. DARPA Award for more responsive AI that combines human and machine

    The goal of Lasecki’s proposal is to create methods for making AI systems more robust and flexible.

  7. How a spray from the hardware store could improve nuclear fusion

    A coating of polyurethane keeps plasma problems in check during magnetic compression.

    The post How a spray from the hardware store could improve nuclear fusion appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

  8. “Mind reading” study looks inside coders’ brains

    Using real-time fMRI readings, researchers linked spatial reasoning with CS problem solving.

  9. Automated tool optimizes complex programs better than humans

    Erie provided database repairs that were previously performed exclusively by human programmers.

  10. Shoe-box size breath-analyzer spots deadly lung disease faster, more accurately than doctors

    The device could also be used to detect other diseases such as pneumonia, sepsis, asthma and others associated with lung or systemic blood inflammation.

    The post Shoe-box size breath-analyzer spots deadly lung disease faster, more accurately than doctors appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.