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Artificial Intelligence

How can we harness the power of modern computers and massive sets of data to help us solve complex problems?

Can we train computers to “learn” on their own without incorporating our own assumptions and biases? Medicine, autonomous vehicles, image analysis, advertising, robotics … AI has an impact on all aspects of life in the 21st Century.

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Aerospace Engineering
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Biomedical Engineering
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Chemical Engineering
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Civil Engineering
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Climate & Meteorology
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Computer Engineering
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Computer Science
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Data Science
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Electrical Engineering
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Environmental Engineering
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Industrial & Operations Engineering
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Mechanical Engineering
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Naval Architecture & Marine Engineering
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Space Sciences & Engineering
Robotics Tile
Robotics

AI chips could get a sense of time

Timekeeping in the brain is done with neurons that relax at different rates after receiving a signal; now memristors—hardware analogues of neurons—can do that too.

The post AI chips could get a sense of time appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Spatial atlas of the human ovary with cell-level resolution will bolster reproductive research

Most human oocytes never get a chance to mature into eggs—a new study sheds light on why.

The post Spatial atlas of the human ovary with cell-level resolution will bolster reproductive research appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Better battery manufacturing: Robotic lab vets new reaction design strategy

Mixing unconventional ingredients in just the right order can make complex materials with fewer impurities. The robotic lab that tested the idea could be widely adopted.

The post Better battery manufacturing: Robotic lab vets new reaction design strategy appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

First atlas of the human ovary with cell-level resolution is a step toward artificial ovary

Most human oocytes never get a chance to mature into eggs—a new study sheds light on why.

The post First atlas of the human ovary with cell-level resolution is a step toward artificial ovary appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

GenAI diffusion models learn to generate new content more consistently than expected

Award-winning research led by Prof. Qing Qu discovered an intriguing phenomenon that diffusion models consistently produce nearly identical content starting from the same noise input, regardless of model architectures or training procedures.

Auto industry deadlines loom for impaired-driver detection tech, U-M offers a low-cost solution

Current technologies already in use could help prevent crashes and deaths linked to impaired driving.

The post Auto industry deadlines loom for impaired-driver detection tech, U-M offers a low-cost solution appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Human stem cells coaxed to mimic the very early central nervous system

The first organized stem cell culture model that resembles all three sections of the embryonic brain and spinal cord could shed light on developmental brain diseases.

The post Human stem cells coaxed to mimic the very early central nervous system appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Widely used AI tool for early sepsis detection may be cribbing doctors’ suspicions

When using only data collected before patients with sepsis received treatments or medical tests, the model’s accuracy was no better than a coin toss.

The post Widely used AI tool for early sepsis detection may be cribbing doctors’ suspicions appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Leader in robotics at U-M and beyond elected to National Academy of Engineering

Dawn Tilbury is recognized for advances in manufacturing network control and human-robot interaction, as well as engineering leadership.

The post Leader in robotics at U-M and beyond elected to National Academy of Engineering appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

U-M team receives NIH grant for collaborative research to speed ARDS diagnosis

University of Michigan researchers examine if molecular compounds in exhaled breath could lead to improved diagnosis and tracking of acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS).

The post U-M team receives NIH grant for collaborative research to speed ARDS diagnosis appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Is lung cancer treatment working? This chip can tell from a blood draw

By trapping and concentrating tiny numbers of cancer cells from blood samples, the device can identify whether a treatment is working at the four-week mark.

The post Is lung cancer treatment working? This chip can tell from a blood draw appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Linking online and offline social networks to better predict real world impact

Prof. Lei Ying leads a new MURI that is focused on the interplay between online and offline networks and how they could impact disruptive behavior and events.

Squishy, metal-free magnets to power robots and guide medical implants

Strong enough to move soft robots and medical capsules, weak enough to not ruin MRI images.

The post Squishy, metal-free magnets to power robots and guide medical implants appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Better prosthetics: $3M to develop more natural robotic leg control

An effort to create a control model that moves seamlessly between different activities like standing, walking and climbing stairs is renewed by the National Institutes of Health.

The post Better prosthetics: $3M to develop more natural robotic leg control appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Clinicians could be fooled by biased AI, despite explanations

Regulators pinned their hopes on clinicians being able to spot flaws in explanations of an AI model’s logic, but a study suggests this isn’t a safe approach.

The post Clinicians could be fooled by biased AI, despite explanations appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Understanding attention in large language models

How do chatbots based on the transformer architecture decide what to pay attention to in a conversation? They’ve made their own machine learning algorithms to tell them.

The post Understanding attention in large language models appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Biases in large image-text AI model favor wealthier, Western perspectives

AI model that pairs text, images performs poorly on lower-income or non-Western images, potentially increasing inequality in digital technology representation.

The post Biases in large image-text AI model favor wealthier, Western perspectives appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Building Flint’s trust in its drinking water

Even with lead service line replacement, the city’s water has issues that require public education.

The post Building Flint’s trust in its drinking water appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Building a chemical ‘GPT’ to help design a key battery component

Taking inspiration from the word-predicting large language models, a U-M team is kickstarting an atom-predicting model with 200,000 node hours on Argonne’s Polaris.

The post Building a chemical ‘GPT’ to help design a key battery component appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Century-old question on fluid in lungs answered

A “new physiological flow” modeled in the body could aid in treatment of lung infections and pulmonary edema.

The post Century-old question on fluid in lungs answered appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Simple neural networks outperform the state-of-the-art for controlling robotic prosthetics 

And that tracks with the way our motor circuits work—we’re not that complicated.

The post Simple neural networks outperform the state-of-the-art for controlling robotic prosthetics  appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

How sound waves trigger immune responses to cancer in mice

Technique pioneered at the University of Michigan could improve outcomes for cancer and neurological conditions.

The post How sound waves trigger immune responses to cancer in mice appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Study finds exhaled breath could enhance detection, diagnosis of COVID-19 and variants

Research suggests volatile organic compounds in breath could mark distinction between COVID-19, variants and non-COVID illnesses.

The post Study finds exhaled breath could enhance detection, diagnosis of COVID-19 and variants appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Tumor-destroying soundwaves receive FDA approval for liver treatment in humans

Technique developed at the University of Michigan provides a non-invasive alternative to surgery, chemotherapy and radiation treatments for cancer.

The post Tumor-destroying soundwaves receive FDA approval for liver treatment in humans appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

A brain game may predict your risk of infection

When a person’s cognitive function is highly variable, they’re likely to be more infectious and have more symptoms after exposure to a respiratory virus.

The post A brain game may predict your risk of infection appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

U-M researchers helping to develop a machine for on-demand N95 mask manufacturing

A new industry partnership seeks to enable on-demand local manufacturing of next-generation N95s with innovative designs and materials.

The post U-M researchers helping to develop a machine for on-demand N95 mask manufacturing appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Bioengineer and M.D. receives Packard Fellowship to study cellular memory

The unique program awards $875k in flexible funding.

The post Bioengineer and M.D. receives Packard Fellowship to study cellular memory appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Tracking radiation treatment in real time promises safer, more effective cancer therapy 

The ability to accurately detect where X-rays land and in what dose could reduce the collateral damage from radiation therapy.

The post Tracking radiation treatment in real time promises safer, more effective cancer therapy  appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

U-M CSE research team advances to top five in Amazon Alexa Prize Simbot Challenge

The challenge is a means of pushing forward with their research into development of next-generation embodied AI agents.

LG AI Research and CSE build on successful partnership

A delegation from LG AI Research visited campus to review LG-funded projects in process and discuss future collaborations.

Thatchaphol Saranurak recognized with 2023 Presburger Award

The award recognizes the outstanding contributions of a young scientist in the field of theoretical computer science.

Olivia Lee awarded NSF Graduate Research Fellowship for brain-machine interfaces that could improve control of robotic prostheses

Lee designs implantable and wearable electronics to help restore movement to those who have lost limbs or have been paralyzed.

Michigan and ECE advancing computer vision at CVPR 2023

Look at some of the ways ECE and other University of Michigan researchers are using computer vision for real-world applications.

For the first time, controlling the degree of twist in nanostructure particles

Being able to decide not only whether a micron-scale particle twists but also how much could open new avenues for machine vision and more.

The post For the first time, controlling the degree of twist in nanostructure particles appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

World’s first realistic simulated driving environment based on ‘crash-prone’ Michigan intersection

Real-time data collected at the two-lane roundabout will be used to efficiently test the safety of autonomous vehicles.

The post World’s first realistic simulated driving environment based on ‘crash-prone’ Michigan intersection appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

AI could run a million microbial experiments per year

Automation uncovers combinations of amino acids that feed two bacterial species and could tell us much more about the 90% of bacteria that humans have hardly studied.

The post AI could run a million microbial experiments per year appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Nanobiotics: AI for discovering where and how nanoparticles bind with proteins

A new tool in the fight against superbugs goes beyond protein folding simulations like AlphaFold, potentially revealing antibiotic candidates.

The post Nanobiotics: AI for discovering where and how nanoparticles bind with proteins appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

AI tool helps optimize antibody medicines

Machine learning points out why antibodies fail to stay on target, binding to molecules that aren’t markers of disease—and suggests better designs.

The post AI tool helps optimize antibody medicines appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Senate testimony: AI risks to the financial sector

U-M professor of computer science and engineering identifies new concerns that recent AI advances pose for financial markets.

The post Senate testimony: AI risks to the financial sector appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Toyota Research Institute and Michigan Engineering discuss importance of long-standing partnership

As the auto industry expands beyond transportation, university collaborations are more important than ever.

The post Toyota Research Institute and Michigan Engineering discuss importance of long-standing partnership appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Choosing exoskeleton settings like a Pandora radio station

Using a simple and convenient touchscreen interface, the algorithm learns the assistance preferences of the wearer.

The post Choosing exoskeleton settings like a Pandora radio station appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Outsmarting floodwaters

The world needs better tools to protect people during floods. A new machine learning method could help.

The post Outsmarting floodwaters appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Soon-to-be most powerful laser in the US is open for experiments

The NSF-supported facility at U-M is about to begin welcoming researchers to study extreme physics that could advance medicine, microelectronics and more.

The post Soon-to-be most powerful laser in the US is open for experiments appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Shaping the quantum future with lightwave electronics

The semiconductor-compatible technology is a million times faster than existing electronics and could give us access to an entire new world of quantum phenomena.

U-Michigan a partner in two CHIPS Act Midwest microelectronics hubs

The latest DoD funding announcements bolster Michigan Engineering’s efforts to support revitalization of the U.S. semiconductor sector.

The post U-Michigan a partner in two CHIPS Act Midwest microelectronics hubs appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Semiconductor workforce program increases access to hands-on training

‘In undergrad, you sometimes feel like you’re just passing classes. But what we’re doing here is science.’

The post Semiconductor workforce program increases access to hands-on training appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Prof. Aline Eid seeks to better perceive the world using a 5G Wireless Power Grid

Prof. Eid is looking to design the future of smart cities and infrastructures using ultra-low power wireless sensing and communications technologies.

Prof. Aline Eid seeks to further knowledge of the world with a 5G Wireless Power Grid

Prof. Eid is looking to design the future of smart cities and infrastructures using ultra-low power wireless sensing and communications technologies.

Organic photovoltaics offer realistic pathway to power-generating windows

A new fabrication process greatly improves the reliability of highly-efficient semi-transparent solar cells, which can be applied to windows to generate solar power.

Inside the Quantum Research Institute

Mack Kira, co-director of the Quantum Research Institute with Steven Cundiff, is ready to take Michigan’s quantum activities to the next level.

Advancing chips for the auto sector is the goal of new Michigan-based initiative

U-Michigan joins industry, state, education partners to develop talent and technology.

Focused ambitions

While hunger for an artificial intelligence that can think like a human remains unsated, AI continues to appear in our lives in smaller ways.

The post Focused ambitions appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

New undergraduate courses prepare students for the Second Quantum Revolution

Quantum information science and engineering is one of the hottest fields in engineering – and ECE wants to make it accessible to everyone.

Optimization could cut the carbon footprint of AI training by up to 75%

Deep learning models that power giants like TikTok and Amazon, as well as tools like ChatGPT, could save energy without new hardware or infrastructure.

The post Optimization could cut the carbon footprint of AI training by up to 75% appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Wastewater dashboard adds monkeypox, flu and more for five southeast Michigan communities

The results of monitoring for diseases beyond COVID-19 are now publicly available for Ann Arbor, Flint, Jackson, Tecumseh and Ypsilanti.

The post Wastewater dashboard adds monkeypox, flu and more for five southeast Michigan communities appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Simulated terrible drivers cut the time and cost of AV testing by a factor of one thousand

New virtual testing environment breaks the ‘curse of rarity’ for autonomous vehicle emergency decision-making.

The post Simulated terrible drivers cut the time and cost of AV testing by a factor of one thousand appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Sangmin Yoo awarded Predoctoral Fellowship to support research impacting next generation computing

Yoo is making memory devices more flexible and tunable, making them irresistible for modern AI applications.

Aditya Varma Muppala awarded Predoctoral Fellowship to support research impacting imaging systems

Aditya is creating high-resolution, accessible, scalable, and portable imaging radars that are 200x cheaper and 100x smaller than what is currently available.

From new material to device: Ferroelectric HEMT could be a game changer for next generation electronics

Prof. Zetian Mi’s team proved the viability of a reconfigurable, ScAlN/AlGaN/GaN ferroelectric HEMT transistor that is critical for next-generation communication and computing systems

Parag Deotare awarded DURIP grant to probe exciton energy transport at nanoscale

The tool is expected to advance the study of exciton dynamics, which could help identify new research directions for clean energy and information technology.

Arthur Xiao receives SVCF Scholarship to support his research in semiconductor materials

Xiao has been working on several projects in Prof. Zetian’s Mi’s group, including micro LED technology and renewable energy.

Ishtiaque Navid receives SVCF Scholarship to support his research in semiconductor materials

Navid’s research is focused on artificial photosynthesis and optoelectronics using III-Nitride based semiconductor materials.

Nanoscale ferroelectric semiconductor could power AI and post-Moore’s Law computing on a phone

Next-gen computing material gets down to the right size for modern manufacturing.

The post Nanoscale ferroelectric semiconductor could power AI and post-Moore’s Law computing on a phone appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Scalable method to manufacture thin film transistors achieves ultra-clean interface for high performance, low-voltage device operation

Led by Prof. Becky Peterson, the research focuses on a category of materials important for low power logic operations, high pixel density screens, touch screens, and haptic displays.

The post Scalable method to manufacture thin film transistors achieves ultra-clean interface for high performance, low-voltage device operation appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Six ECE faculty will help shape the future of semiconductors as part of the JUMP 2.0 program

Elaheh Ahmadi, David Blaauw, Michael Flynn, Hun-Seok Kim, Hessam Mahdavifar, and Zhengya Zhang bring their expertise and creativity to this nationwide undertaking in the area of semiconductors and information & communication technologies.

Open-source hardware: a growing movement to democratize IC design

Dr. Mehdi Saligane, a leader in the open-source chip design community, was among the first researchers to fabricate a successful chip as part of Google’s multi-project wafer program.

The post Open-source hardware: a growing movement to democratize IC design appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Major breakthrough in dynamic graph algorithms earns Best Paper

Thatchaphol Saranurak and collaborators were recognized at SODA ’23 for their work that broke an approximation barrier in dynamic graph matching.

“It’s a supportive and collaborative environment” — making connections as a PhD student in and outside the classroom

U-M CSE PhD candidate Sarah Jabbour discusses how collaboration is centered in her experience as a graduate student.

Diversity and inclusiveness are an essential part of the pursuit of AI at CSE

The Michigan AI Lab is focused on building a community of diverse viewpoints in an effort to reduce the bias we see in the exploding world of artificial intelligence.

“It’s a supportive and collaborative environment” — making connections as a PhD candidate in and outside the classroom

U-M CSE PhD candidate Sarah Jabbour discusses how collaboration is centered in her experience as a graduate student.

New non-invasive optical imaging approach for monitoring brain health could improve outcomes for traumatic brain injury patients

The SCISCCO system could better monitor brain and organ metabolism, helping to diagnose concussions, monitor cerebral metabolism in traumatic brain injury patients, and gauge the response of organs to treatments in an operating or emergency room scenario.

The post New non-invasive optical imaging approach for monitoring brain health could improve outcomes for traumatic brain injury patients appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Best paper for a low-power ADC circuit for brain-machine interface applications

Euisik Yoon’s team, led by Sungjin Oh, developed a low-power neural recording front-end circuit to interface with state-of-the-art neural probes.

The post Best paper for a low-power ADC circuit for brain-machine interface applications appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Miniature and durable spectrometer for wearable applications

A team led by P.C. Ku and Qing Qu has developed a miniature, paper-thin spectrometer measuring 0.16mm2 that can also withstand harsh environments.

The post Miniature and durable spectrometer for wearable applications appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Jesse Codling wins Best Presentation award for sensors that help protect these little piggies in their pens

Known affectionately as “The Sh*tty Project,” Codling, an ECE PhD student, monitors the vibrations in pig pens to track the health of the piglets and predict when they’re in danger.

U-M, Schmidt Futures to partner on new AI research program

$10M will fund training for 60 postdoctoral fellows as part of international cohort.

Gravity’s impact on bone cells—experiments heading to the International Space Station

Mechanical engineers at the University of Michigan are tackling mysteries of bone density loss in space and on Earth.

The post Gravity’s impact on bone cells—experiments heading to the International Space Station appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Expert take: Engineering for the success of humanity

Three Michigan Engineering faculty help to elevate communities and systems through a people-first approach to teaching.

The post Expert take: Engineering for the success of humanity appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Bringing smart banking to market

Jason Mars, CEO of Ann Arbor startup Clinc, was named #2 in Bank Innovations’s “10 Most innovative CEOs in Banking 2017” list. Clinc is leading the pack for development of intelligent banking assistant software.

“Stitching” together a web user from scattered, messy data

Even though we interact with different web services in different ways, there are clues in the data that can indicate trends and identify a unique profile.

Study maps careers of CS PhDs using decades of data

The researchers identified movement between industry, academia, and government work, tracked the growth of important organizations, and built predictive models for career transitions and employer retention.

Finding meaning in varied data

Jie Song devised a method to combine summarized datasets that group information by incompatible units.

Tool for structuring data creates efficiency for data scientists

Foofah is a tool that can help to minimize the effort and required background knowledge needed to clean up data.

Making software failures a little less catastrophic

Researchers have implemented a new way to diagnose software failures with a high degree of accuracy and efficiency.

Gaining a deeper understanding of how personal values are expressed in text

Researchers used hierarchical trees to provide a better idea of how concepts are represented and related in a collection of text.

Helping drivers use smart cars smarter

This conversational in-vehicle digital assistant can respond to drivers’ questions and commands in natural language

Speeding up code with clever data manipulation

Kasikci presents a method to improve a program’s ability to use data in a straightforward, efficient way

Personalized knowledge graphs for faster search and digital assistants

Graphs that are customized, stored locally, and able to change over time can enable faster and more accurate searching and digital assistants

Two solutions for GPU efficiency can boost AI performance

Chowdhury’s lab multiplied the number of jobs a GPU cluster can finish in a set amount of time

Paper award for identifying speaker characteristics in text messages

The goal of the work was to identify seven things about who the subject was talking to just by analyzing text messages.

Student awarded NSF Fellowship for automating speech-based disease classification

Perez’s research focuses on analyzing speech patterns of patients with Huntington Disease.

CAREER Award for deeper insights into interconnected data: from neurons to web searches

Danai Koutra earned the award for her proposal to innovate the way we use networks to understand the world and speed up our technology.

Automated tool optimizes complex programs better than humans

Erie provided database repairs that were previously performed exclusively by human programmers.

“Mind reading” study looks inside coders’ brains

Using real-time fMRI readings, researchers linked spatial reasoning with CS problem solving.

New browser strategy game has players tackle real-life bat catastrophe

As a fungal infection ravages bat populations, the new game hopes to promote public awareness of ongoing research to combat the issue.

Creating more efficient data centers for AI

Tang’s project will redesign data center systems to support large-scale use of hardware accelerators to meet future computational demand.

$1M NSF grant supports new system for gathering, structuring data with ease

The team’s new tool will combine of software and data to make gathering structured data dramatically easier.

$2M NSF grant to explore data equity systems

Researchers plan to establish a framework for a national institute that would enable research using sensitive data, while preventing misuse and misinterpretation.

CSE faculty bring significant showing to major systems conference

Researchers designed three new systems to speed up code at several key bottlenecks.

Best Student Paper Award for work on faster network classification for machine learning

Comparing graphs the team’s tool is up to an order of magnitude faster than competitive baselines.

Three faculty earn MIDAS grants to broaden the frontiers of data science

This round of funding strongly encourages pioneering work with the potential for major expansion.

Generating realistic stock market data for deeper financial research

A team at Michigan proposed an approach to generating realistic and high-fidelity stock market data to enable broader study of financial markets.

Emotion recognition has a privacy problem – here’s how to fix it

Researchers have demonstrated the ability to “unlearn” sensitive identifying data from audio used to train machine learning models.

Programming around Moore’s Law with automatic code translation

Most programs in use today have to be completely rewritten at a very low level to reap the benefits of hardware acceleration. This system demonstrates how to make that translation automatic.

Predoctoral Fellowship for mathematically provable hardware design

Goel designs algorithms that can automatically demonstrate the correctness of hardware systems.

Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship for design of robust, reliable and repairable software systems

Subarno Banerjee uses program analysis to improve software systems’ safety and security.

Undergraduate research on speeding up data centers earns ACM first prize

The student’s project targets critical moments where the next instruction in a program is only available in a slower type of memory.

Building better coronavirus databases with automatic quality checks

The team will build high-quality datasets to enable automatic quality checking and fraud detection of the new coronavirus data.

Research team takes on food insecurity in Detroit in the face of coronavirus limitations

Researchers are working with the city on two key initiatives to address food availability for elderly and low-income populations.

Get to know: Xinyu Wang

“My research has the potential to democratize programming and make it possible for millions of people around the globe to automate otherwise tedious tasks using programming.”

New method ensures complex programs are bug-free without testing

The system targets software that runs using concurrent execution, a widespread method for boosting performance, and proves whether a program will output what it’s supposed to.

NIST finalists for post-quantum security standards include research results developed by Prof. Chris Peikert

A new secure code is needed to protect private information from the power of quantum computing.

Alumnus Yi-Jun Chang Wins PODC Dissertation Award

His work is in complexity theory of distributed computing.

Prof. Baris Kasikci recognized as rising star by Intel

The award recognizes early career faculty who show great promise in developing future computing technologies.

Tool to automate popular security technique earns distinguished paper

The new technique automatically constructs policies for applications that keep them from compromising other programs.

Building a testing-free future

How automated guarantees that our most complex programs are secure and trustworthy can save us time, money, and anxiety.

New database sheds light on Michigan’s videogame boom

The Michigan Game Studios database, developed by lecturer Austin Yarger, helps organize the state’s rapidly growing scene.

Tim Dunn selected for NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Through his work, Tim hopes to dramatically accelerate genomic sequencing analysis, enabling the use of handheld genomic sequencers to produce actionable diagnostic data within minutes.

Postdoc Leqi Zhu wins PODC Dissertation Award

The thesis completely solves a longstanding open problem in the theory of distributed computing.

Solution for restoring faulty graphs earns best paper award

Prof. Greg Bodwin has devised a solution to an important open question in graph theory that offers promising new options for repairing and constructing resilient networks.

Google Award to make widely used software testing technique more effective

Baris Kasikci plans to improve software fuzzers by learning how deployed software is most commonly run by users.

Using negative probability for quantum solutions

Probabilities with a negative sign have been of great use in quantum physics.

Third Annual Data Mining Workshop Brings Together 100+ Researchers

100+ researchers from across the University of Michigan and from industry gathered on North Campus for the third U-M Workshop on Data Mining.

Michigan Researchers Win Best Paper Award at VLDB 2015

The paper proposes an interactive natural language interface for relational databases, which enables novice users to construct complex queries.

Censys enables fast searching of actionable internet data

The software enables users to ask questions about the hosts and networks that compose the Internet and get an immediate reply.

Barzan Mozafari receives NSF CAREER Award to improve predictability of database systems

Prof. Mozafari is passionate about building large-scale data-intensive systems that are more scalable, more robust, and more predictable.

Michael J. Cafarella selected for Sloan Research Fellowship

He has built software systems for information extraction, database integration, and feature engineering and applied these to problems in the social sciences.

Walter Lasecki and collaborators win Best Paper at W4A

The paper explores how automated speech recognition and crowd-sourced human correction and generation of transcripts can be traded off to improve accuracy and latency.

Google, U-M to build digital tools for Flint water crisis

CSE students and faculty will collaborate as a part of a larger team to help respond to the crisis.

Shadows in the Dark Web

Secrets lurk in the dark web, the 95 percent of the internet that most of us can’t see. One U-M professor is bringing some of those secrets to light, making the digital and the real world a little safer.

Researchers to use brain scans to understand gender bias in software development

The team will use fMRI to identify some of the underlying processes that occur when a code reviewer weighs in on a piece of software and its author.

Open-source software helps youth with disabilities develop scheduling independence

The system can add more flexibility to task management apps to help learning users make informed decisions about their time.

Roadmap for teachers: U-M free online learning platform paves the way

K-5 teachers and students throughout Michigan are building thriving learning communities online by using free deeply-digital, standards-aligned curricula and platform developed by the U-M Center for Digital Curricula.

Smart bridges under development with new grant

The monitoring system will collect data from surface and penetrating sensors, then wirelessly relay the information to an inspector on site or miles away.

J. Alex Halderman to Teach Course on Electronic and Internet Voting through Coursera

The 5-week course will provide the technical background and public policy foundation that today’s citizens need to understand the electronic voting debate.

Duo of CSE Alums Form and Grow Security Company in Ann Arbor

Serial entrepreneur Dug Song (CS BS 1997) and recent alum Jon Oberheide (CSE PhD 2011) founded security firm Duo Security in early 2010 and have rapidly grown their company to serve over 500 customers in 40+ countries around the world.

Todd Austin and colleague author new edition of book on structured computer organization

Students compete to create game-playing bots in weekend programming contest

Researchers funded to develop a leap forward in Processor Architectures

The project proposes to produce a parallel heterogeneous 3D near-threshold computing system with unprecedented energy efficiency.

Security risks found in sensors for heart devices, consumer electronics

Karem Sakallah Continues Commitment to Qatar Computing Research Institute

Heartbleed: behind the scenes at CSE

Listening to bipolar disorder: smartphone app detects mood swings via voice analysis

Making smartphones smarter: hijack adopted for use in commercial product

Wakefield and Kieras win Best Paper Award at ICAD 2014

The paper addresses how to manage multiple sources so that the user can maximize the information gained from each acoustic source.

Can our computers continue to get smaller and more powerful?

Researchers demo hack to seize control of municipal traffic signal systems

Shared Memory in Mobile Operating Systems Provides Ingress Point for Hackers

HiJack Enables a Smartphone Dongle for Diagnosis of Infectious Diseases

HiJack is a hardware/software platform that utilizes the headset jack on a smartphone as a universal power/data interface.

World’s Largest Processor Announced; Perfect for Big Data – and Other Applications

A really big chip is ready to take on really big challenges.

Virta Labs Introduces PowerGuard™

Virta Laboratories was co-founded in part by Prof. Kevin Fu and former CSE postdoctoral researcher Denis Foo Kune.

Researchers Receive NSF/Intel Award to Develop Visual Recognition System for Wearable Devices

The researchers are finding a solution to implement state-of-the-art vision systems in wearable devices where there is little heat dissipation

Passwords, privacy and protection: Can Apple meet FBI’s demand without creating a ‘backdoor’?

Prof. H.V. Jagadish sheds light on current issues regarding data privacy and technology.

Pressure-sensing smartphones: Software lets mobile devices feel force

New software developed by CSE engineers and inspired, in part, by a Batman movie, could give any smartphone the capacity to sense force or pressure on its screen or body.

Michigan chips will be first to test next-generation hardware design tools

U-M team will serve as model for nimble and innovative system-on-chip design.

ADA Center holds 2020 symposium with virtual attendance, highlighting new research into computer design

The symposium highlighted new developments in computer architecture, and included a session on how the center’s research can contribute to limiting the impact of pandemics.

Jason Flinn earns Test of Time award for 1999 invention of adaptable battery use in mobile apps

The approaches to energy adaptation he proposed are now commonplace, and the applications he analyzed (web browsers, voice recognition, video players, and maps) are still ubiquitous.

Precision health in the palm of your hand

Recent breakthrough developments in technologies for real-time genome sequencing, analysis, and diagnosis are poised to deliver a new standard of personalized care.

Thomas Wenisch selected as Maurice Wilkes Award Recipient

The award recognizes Prof. Wenisch’s contributions to memory persistency and energy-efficient systems.

Kang G. Shin recognized with Distinguished Leadership Award by IEEE Computer Society Technical & Conference Activities Board

His work in the area of real-time computing has spanned decades and has had impact in a broad range of applications.

Two papers announced among 10 most influential in healthcare and infection control

The papers provide data-driven solutions to hospital infection and the use of machine learning in healthcare.

Precision Health Award for measuring moods

The result will be new measurement methods to determine how moods are shaped by both the behavior of an individual and daily interactions over time

Rackham Fellowship for enabling autonomous agents to learn continuously

“What I’m doing is trying to come up with ideas to let the agent continue learning different skills across its life.”

A quicker eye for robotics to help in cluttered environments

New algorithm can help robots go from structured environments like factories to complex, unstructured places like our homes.

New lecture series brings AI to the public

The new event series aims to create an educational environment for the public.

Paper recognized for lasting contributions to AI decision making

Baveja’s paper tackled the difficult problem of giving artificial intelligence a way to understand and represent knowledge collected over time.

DARPA Award for more responsive AI that combines human and machine

The goal of Lasecki’s proposal is to create methods for making AI systems more robust and flexible.

Year of growth, experiments for May Mobility

May Mobility intends to gradually acclimate the public to the experience of autonomous driving.

Taking machine-learning models in health care from concept to bedside

The authors provide an overview of common challenges to implementing ML in a health-care setting, and describe the necessity of breaking down the silos in ML.

New attack on autonomous vehicle sensors creates fake obstacles

Up to this point, no attacks had been discovered targeting a car’s LiDAR system—but a major new finding from researchers at the University of Michigan has demonstrated what that might look like.

Michigan AI celebrates second annual symposium

The goal of the symposium is to facilitate conversations between AI practitioners from Michigan and beyond.

Alumnus Peter Wurman inducted into National Inventors Hall of Fame

Wurman and his cofounders were recognized for their invention of the Kiva system, a revolutionary warehouse order fulfillment system that uses mobile robots and control software to bring inventory shelves to workers.

CSE researchers present 9 papers at leading AI conference

The students and faculty submitted projects spanning several key application areas for AI.

Emily Mower Provost named Toyota Faculty Scholar

Her work uses machine learning to measure mood, emotion, and other aspects of human behavior for purposes of providing early or real-time interventions for people in managing their health.

Computer scientists employ AI to help address COVID-19 challenges

Five multidisciplinary research teams are working on projects to assist with the coronavirus outbreak and to help find solutions to pressing problems.

Faculty Profile: Emily Mower Provost

Mower Provost talks about getting awards, doing industry research, understanding human behavior – and Star Wars.

Research on human biases in AI learning earns best student paper award

The project, which received a best paper award, demonstrated that a certain bias in humans who train intelligent agents significantly reduced the effectiveness of the training.

AI-powered interviewer provides guided reflection exercises during COVID-19 pandemic

The virtual interviewer uses therapeutic writing techniques to help users cope with difficult situations.

Model helps robots think more like humans when searching for objects

The model is a practical method for robots to look for target items in complex, realistic environments.

Baris Kasikci earns CAREER Award to automatically improve software quality with data from everyday program use

Kasikci will sift through the byproducts of hundreds of millions of common program executions to determine how this data can automate some key steps in bug finding and fixing.

Prof. Danai Koutra recognized as rising star with ACM SIGKDD Award

The Rising Star Award is based on an individual’s whole body of work in the first five years after the PhD.

New research teaches AI how people move with internet videos

The project enables neural networks to model how people are positioned based on only partial views of their bodies, like perspective shots in instructional videos or vlogs.

Student NASA award supports work on more dexterous, collaborative space robots

PhD student Emily Sheetz is working to design more dexterous robots to work alongside humans in space.

Incoming faculty Anhong Guo named one of Forbes’ 30 Under 30 in Science

This distinction recognizes young researchers with exceptional promise who are having an impact on the world.

Zeyu Zheng selected for JP Morgan PhD Fellowship

His work on reinforcement learning is aimed at accelerating the training of RL agents.

Seven papers by CSE researchers presented at AAAI 2021

Twelve students and faculty co-authored papers spanning several key application areas for AI.

Qi Zhang selected as first recipient of David J. Kuck Dissertation Prize

His work is in the area of coordinating systems of autonomous agents that operate in uncertain, dynamic environments.

Lu Wang earns CAREER Award to summarize long text with machine learning

Wang hopes that, by summarizing longer documents, she can make a new class of information more accessible to a variety of audiences.

CSE doctoral student Tara Safavi receives Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship

The fellowship will advance her work in inferring relational world knowledge in machines with explicit and implicit representations.

Zhizhuo Zhou selected for NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Zhizhuo is interested in computer vision and its ability to make breakthroughs in interdisciplinary fields such as ecology and climatology.

Sky CH Wang selected for NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Through his work in NLP and computational social science, Sky hopes to understand complex social interactions and contribute towards the democratization of technology.

Jaylin Herskovitz selected for NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Through her work in augmented reality, Jaylin hopes to improve the accessibility of emerging technologies for people with disabilities and expand access to computing.

Best paper award for a robot that can see and move transparent objects

A new method enables robot arms to build a tower of champagne glasses.

Helping autonomous agents make smarter decisions in chaotic environments

A new algorithm gives autonomous agents the ability to take in batches of multiple instructions at once while responding dynamically to changes in their surroundings.

Generating 3D spaces from a single picture

New model PixelSynth creates an interactive experience given just a single image.

Joyce Chai named ACL Fellow for significant contributions to grounded natural language processing and the interaction between language processing and robotics

Prof. Chai has been recognized for significant contributions to grounded natural language processing and the interaction between language processing and robotics.

David Fouhey receives NSF CAREER Award for vision system to perceive the interactive world

His goal is to build AI systems that can recognize and understand a 3D and interactive world from a single image.

LG AI Research opens North American Artificial Intelligence Research Center in Ann Arbor with strong ties to U-M

The LG AI Research Center, and its partnership with U-M, represents a commitment by LG to become a leader in developing advanced AI technologies.

Natural Language Processing at Michigan Research Day

The meetup was intended to foster connections between researchers across campus with an interest in the development and application of NLP.

Prof. Xinyu Wang collaborates with UiPath to democratize automation

The two will collaborate on building new programming techniques that are accessible to non-experts and non-programmers.

U-M team reaches next phase of Amazon Alexa Prize SimBot Challenge

Team SEAGULL, led by doctoral student Yichi Zhang and advised by Prof. Joyce Chai, strives to develop embodied AI agents capable of attending to users’ needs, following natural language instructions, collaborating, and continuously improving through interaction.

Six new projects funded by LG AI Research  

The projects are a part of LG’s mission to advance AI such as Deep Reinforcement Learning, 3D Scene Understanding, and Reasoning with a Large-scale Language Model and Bias & Fairness related to AI ethics.

Decisive differences in healthcare AI

When decisions about your healthcare are informed by AI, bias in machine learning can have dire consequences. Ph.D. student Trenton Chang researches how inequities in healthcare delivery impact machine learning and AI.

Leaders in ultra low power cicuits and systems presenting at VLSI Circuits Symposium

All of the research being presented focuses on getting the absolute best performance from the tiniest circuits, sensors, and electronic devices.

Making smart dust a reality

This research is expected to have a fundamental and long term impact on a diverse set of applications ranging from energy conservation to health care.

MBus is the missing interconnect for millimeter-scale systems

The M3 is a fully autonomous computing system that acts as a smart sensing system.

High Efficiency Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes to sterilize pathogens, including COVID-19

Research led by Prof. Zetian Mi has been honored with the 2020 Editor-in-Chief Choice Award from “Photonics Research.”

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Mingyan Liu: Confessions of a pseudo data scientist

Liu’s most recent research involves online learning, modeling of large-scale internet measurement data, and incentive mechanisms for security games.

$1.6M toward artificial intelligence for data science

DARPA is trying to build a system that can turn large data sets into models that can make predictions, and U-M is in on the project.

Mingyan Liu, 2018 Distinguished University Innovator, talks about her company and data science commercialization

Mingyan Liu, recipient of the 2018 Distinguished Innovator of the Year award, gave a talk about her startup company and participated on a panel discussing data science commercialiation.

Machine Learning and Systems: A conversation with 2020 Field Award winners Al Hero and Anders Lindquist

Hero and Lindquist took a few minutes to talk about the impact of machine learning on Signal Processing and Control Systems, and what they plan to do about it

Hun-Seok Kim receives CAREER Award to facilitate Internet of Things connectivity

Kim takes an interdisciplinary approach to tackle challenges in heterogeneous classes of energy-efficient and versatile communication systems.

Qing Qu receives CAREER award to explore the foundations of machine learning and data science

His research develops computational methods for learning succinct representations from high-dimensional data.

Designing Synthetic Human Gut Microbiome with AI

Prof. Al Hero was interviewed and gave a presentation about his research using machine learning to improve our understanding of the human gut

First digital single-chip millimeter-wave beamformer will exploit 5G capabilities

The digital beamforming chip offers significant advantages over current analog beamforming solutions.

Mapping quantum structures with light to unlock their capabilities

Rather than installing new “2D” semiconductors in devices to see what they can do, this new method puts them through their paces with lasers and light detectors.

Demba Komma awarded Microsoft Research Ada Lovelace Fellowship for research on IoT localization technologies

Komma, a PhD student, is working to develop robust low powered localization technology for Artificial Intelligence enabled Internet of Things in locations where GPS is limited or blocked.

Elaheh Ahmadi receives CAREER Award to improve efficiency in high power electrical systems

The research could improve efficiency in systems such as electric vehicles, grid systems, mass transit, and industrial automation

Research to advance low-power speech recognition highlighted by Intel

Michael Flynn and his group are applying their groundbreaking work in beamforming to the challenge of low-power on-chip speech recognition.

Prof. Pei Zhang solemnly swears that he’s up to some good

In a project he calls the “Marauder’s Map,” Prof. Zhang uses machine learning-based data models, physics models, and heuristic models to turn physical structures into sensing devices.

ECE Lab Kit team recognized by the College of Engineering with the Team Staff Excellence Award

When the pandemic shut down in-person instruction, this six-member team created and delivered individual lab kits to 1,200 students around the world so hands-on lab experience could continue.

Profiles in ECE: Rucha Apte (MS ECE 2021)

From the internships that inspired her interest in signal & image processing and machine learning to late night study sessions at the Duderstadt to her background in classical dance, Master’s student Rucha Apte shares her journey with us.

Dawn of nitride ferroelectric semiconductors for next-generation electronics

The ability to precisely tune electrical polarization switching through molecular beam epitaxy is a gamechanger

Snails carrying the world’s smallest computer help solve mass extinction survivor mystery

The study yields new insights into the survival of a native snail important to Tahitian culture and ecology and to biologists studying evolution, while proving the viability of similar studies of very small animals including insects

Michigan startup MemryX, Inc. promises faster, cheaper AI processing

The ECE startup builds neuromorphic computer chips uniquely suitable for AI applications

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$1 Million DARPA contract to empower the wireless systems of the future

Prof. Elaheh Ahmadi is working to design a new kind of semiconductor that can provide high power at high frequencies

Elaheh Ahmadi receives DARPA Young Faculty Award to support future sensor and communication systems

Ahmadi’s research is focused on using GaN and Ga2O3 materials to provide higher output power per unit area at higher frequencies.

Egg-carton-style patterning keeps charged nanoparticles in place and suitable for a wide range of applications

Prof. Jay Guo and his team discovered a scalable way to settle down and precisely arrange micro- and nano-sized particles according to size

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Prof. Zetian Mi named IEEE Fellow for his pioneering contributions to III-nitride photonics and clean energy

Mi’s research is impacting the future of alternative energy, as well as improved methods for water purification and air disinfection.

Prof. Euisik Yoon named IEEE Fellow for groundbreaking research in Bio-MEMS

Yoon’s research has contributed to a better understanding of the brain, as well as improved detection and treatment of cancer.

Prof. Heath Hofmann named IEEE Fellow for his impact in the areas of electric machinery and drive systems

Hofmann’s control technology has been implemented in commercial vehicles, and he works tirelessly to enhance opportunities for underrepresented students.

Research full speed ahead on manufacturable III-V materials for next-generation electronics

A recent breakthrough in ferroelectric III-V semiconductors at the University of Michigan has been followed by several advancements and new funding to bring the technology closer to market.

New understanding of neurons in the hippocampus: they’re all the same

A longstanding collaboration between engineers and neuroscientists leads to new insights into how neurons work in the hippocampus.

‘Exciton surfing’ could enable next-gen energy, computing and communications tech

A charge-neutral information carrier could cut energy waste from computing, now that it can potentially be transported within chips.

Ashley Jian awarded Marian Sarah Parker Prize from the College of Engineering

Jian’s research is focused on improving the efficiency of high-power electronics, which is important for energy security and sustainability.

Subhajit Mohanty awarded Richard and Eleanor Towner Prize for Distinguished Academic Achievement

Mohanty’s research is focused on advancing high electron mobility transistors for next generation wireless technologies.

Ashley Jian receives Barbour Scholarship to further her research on high-power electronics

Jian works to improve the efficiency of high-power electronics for better energy security and sustainability.

Touheed Anwar Atif awarded Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship for his research on quantum information and quantum computing

Atif’s coding framework addresses quantum information network coding problems and has helped uncover new insights into the world of quantum information.

New textbook provides hands-on guide for learning about chaotic dynamics and electronic circuits

The book was co-authored by ECE Master’s student Wesley Joo-Chen Thio and Professor Emeritus Julien Sprott of U Wisconsin.

Overcoming the efficiency cliff of red micro-LEDs for virtual/augmented reality

Prof. Zetian Mi leads a team that created highly-efficient red micro LEDs suitable for augmented and virtual reality.

2022 IEEE APS R. W. P. King Award recognizes new theory in computational electromagnetics

Patel and Michielssen developed the Wigner-Smith time delay matrix for electromagnetics.

Ester Bentley receives Impact award for her research with the goal of GPS-free navigation

Bentley presented her research as an NDSEG Fellow. She is working to make smaller, more affordable high accuracy navigation-grade gyroscopes.

ZEUS Joins International Community of Extreme Light Virtuosos

As a member of the X-lites program, ZEUS joins an international community of extreme light labs working together to advance laser science for the benefit of society

First light soon at the most powerful laser in the US

The ZEUS laser at the University of Michigan has begun its commissioning experiments

CHIPS and Science Act: Implications and opportunities

The CHIPS and Science Act of 2022 promises to revitalize the U.S. semiconductor industry. Dennis Sylvester offers his perspective on what it means for ECE.

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Mike Flynn named Fawwaz T. Ulaby Collegiate Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering

Flynn is one of the world’s premier scholars of analog and mixed-signal integrated circuits and systems, analog-to-digital conversion (ADC), and other interface circuits.

An award winning radar system for collision avoidance and imaging

Armin’s research is focused on the development of a sub-millimeter-wave radar system for the next generation of navigation and imaging sensors.

EECS research highlighted at 2016 Robotics: Science and Systems Conference

The University hosted the 2016 Robotics: Science and Systems Conference, which allowed attendees to hear about the latest in robotics through talks, presentations, workshops, and tutorials.

Necmiye Ozay receives NASA Early Career Faculty Award for research in cyber-physical systems

Prof. Ozay’s award-winning work will be used in future space missions

COVE: a tool for advancing progress in computer vision

Centralizing available data in the intelligent systems community through a COmputer Vision Exchange for Data, Annotations and Tools, called COVE.

$1.1 million grant to develop robot emergency response capabilities

Office of Naval Research has awarded Dmitry Berenson, an assistant professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, $1.1 million to help advance emergency response capabilities for robots.

CASSIE: A tougher, lighter bipedal robot with eyes

New walking robot based on birds

Shai Revzen part of a new five-institution MURI focused on the control of dynamic systems

As a member of the DDOTS to PICS MURI, Revzen will advance modeling and control of dynamic systems.

How to build a BigANT – Shai Revzen’s critter-inspired robots

How to build fast and cheap robots

Building more stable four-legged robots

A biologist turned roboticist takes a closer look at dog gaits to help design better movements for four-legged robots.

Dmitry Berenson helps robots play nice with people

Putting our arm movements into code.

BigANT tackles the wave field

Prof. Shai Revzen’s lab in ECE has developed an inexpensive technique to rapidly fabricate a variety of useful robots.

Getting people moving – Walking exoskeletons could mobilize disabled patients

Prof. Jessy Grizzle has long said that his work in robotics could one day be used to help the disabled. Now he and his group, alongside French company Wandercraft, are working to make that claim a reality in the form of walking exoskeletons.

Necmiye Ozay receives ONR Young Investigator Award to advance research in autonomous systems

Research will focus on how autonomous vehicles adapt to wide-ranging changes.

Dmitry Berenson receives NSF CAREER Award to advance a robot’s ability to handle soft objects

Berenson works to improve the ability of autonomous robots to handle soft, deformable objects.

Exoskeletons compete to boost strength of rescue workers

Five college teams test robotic suits that could enhance humans’ abilities.

Paper award for training computer vision systems more accurately

PhD student Jean Young Song offers an improved solution to the problem of image segmentation.

Prof. Jason Corso on artificial intelligence

The most exciting use of AI for me focuses around a better collective use of our available resources, says Corso.

More efficient machine vision technology modeled on human vision

Prof. Robert Dick and advisee Ekdeep Singh Lubana developed a new technique that significantly improves the efficiency of machine vision applications

SLAM-ming good hardware for drone navigation

Researchers built the first visual SLAM processor on a single chip that provides highly accurate, low-power, and real-time results.

Six teams of ECE researchers make the finals at AP-S/URSI 2019

Second Prize overall went to doctoral student Xiuzhang Cai for his radar target classification research applicable to autonomous vehicles.

U-M researchers provide control software to ensure autonomous vehicles stay in their lane

The team was awarded a Best New Application Paper Award by the IEEE Robotics and Automation Society for their work developing reliable control systems for Lane Keeping and Adaptive Cruise Control.

AI-powered Whatsapp Bot fights fake news in India

CE undergrad Amulya Parmar designed a machine learning algorithm to curb fake news as part of the Tavtech Fellowship program.

A World Record for Robotic Deep Freeze Walking

Cassie Blue, the bipedal robot, takes advantage of the 2019 polar vortex to set a record-breaking walk.

The Wolverines Behind the Next Generation of Autonomous Vehicles

The Center for Entrepreneurship profiles a team of EECS students, who are working to develop the next generation of delivery vehicles.

New grant to expand open source control software for an intuitive robotic prosthetic leg

University of Michigan researchers have been awarded an NSF grant to design an open source framework for robotic prosthetic legs that function more naturally and offer a wider range of capabilities.

Fairer AI for long-term equity

Prof. Mingyan Liu is a key member of a project to mitigate bias in Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning systems for long-term equitable outcomes.

3D motion tracking system could streamline vision for autonomous tech

Transparent optical sensor arrays combine with a specialized neural network in new University of Michigan prototype

Mimicking a human fingertip’s sensitivity and sense of direction for robotic applications

With the help of 1.6 million GaN nanopillars per sensor, the University of Michigan team was able to provide human-level sensitivity with directionality on a compact, easily manufactured system

Prof. Peter Seiler named IEEE Fellow for his impactful contributions to robust control theory

Seiler’s contributions to Matlab’s Robust Control Toolbox and to the control of vehicle platoons have resulted in major industrial applications.

Research on modeling time-variant systems earns Brockett-Willems Outstanding Paper Award

Prof. Peter Seiler co-authored the paper that focuses on reachability analysis for a variety of systems, including aircraft control and autonomous vehicles.

Atkins chairs National Academies report on speeding discovery with automated research workflows

Prof. Emeritus Daniel Atkins III chaired and Prof. Al Hero served on a National Academies committee that published a new report describing the impact of artificial intelligence and automated research workflow technologies in propelling research and scientific discovery.

Community-builder Leon Pryor takes Detroit’s FIRST Robotics program to new heights

Having excelled in careers at Microsoft, Amazon, and now Meta, the alum and renowned video game engineer co-founded The Motor City Alliance to make Detroit a powerhouse for FIRST Robotics teams

Tracking Monarch Butterfly Migration with the World’s Smallest Computer

In a project funded by National Geographic, ECE researchers are teaming up with the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology to advance our understanding of monarch butterfly migration with the most ambitious iteration of the Michigan Micro Mote yet.

Nanotech OLED electrode liberates 20% more light, could slash display power consumption

A five-nanometer-thick layer of silver and copper outperforms conventional indium tin oxide without adding cost.

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New $32M center reimagines how computers are designed

‘You shouldn’t need a Ph.D. to design new computing systems.’

Beyond Moore’s law: $16.7M for advanced computing projects

DARPA’s initiative to reinvigorate the microelectronics industry draws deeply on Michigan Engineering expertise.

$1.8M DARPA project aims to protect cars, trucks and spacecraft from hackers

Ironpatch could head off growing danger of security vulnerabilities in vehicle systems.

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Big data, small footprint

How changing the rules of computing could lighten Big Data’s impact on the internet.

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Quantum tech: Semiconductor “flipped” to insulator above room temp

Discovery could pave the way to high speed, low-energy quantum computing.

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Burn after reading

A self-erasing chip for security and anti-counterfeit tech.

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Batteryless next-generation cellular devices could empower a more sustainable future

PhD student Trevor Odelberg is looking to enable long range, highly reliable, and low-power cellular IoT devices that one day can run entirely on harvested energy, reducing battery waste and empowering devices to last for decades.

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$6.25 million to develop new semiconductors for artificial photosynthesis

An interdisciplinary team from four universities are developing a new class of semiconductors for novel artificial photosynthesis and the production of clean chemicals and fuels using sunlight, as part of a DoD MURI

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“Egg carton” quantum dot array could lead to ultralow power devices

By putting a twist on new “2D” semiconductors, researchers have demonstrated their potential for using single photons to transmit information.

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Computer vision: Finding the best teaching frame in a video for fake video fightback

The frame in which a human marks out the boundaries of an object makes a huge difference in how well AI software can identify that object through the rest of the video.

The post Computer vision: Finding the best teaching frame in a video for fake video fightback appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

How predictive modeling could help us reopen more safely

Graphical online simulation could spur more targeted COVID-19 protection measures.

Remodeling the construction industry

Could human-robot collaboration revitalize an outmoded business model and attract new workers?

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“Learning database” speeds queries from hours to seconds

Verdict can make databases deliver answers more than 200 times faster while maintaining 99 percent accuracy.

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Swim with the robots, U-M on the Great Lakes

With a customized Iver 3 underwater drone, the Deep Robotic Optical Perception (DROP) Lab have a new set of underwater eyes that provide a window into the health of the world’s lakes and oceans.

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Chat tool simplifies tricky online privacy policies

Register for an account on just about any website or download an app to your smartphone and you likely will encounter that pesky, “I certify that I’ve read and understand the privacy policy,” check box. “Typically drafted by lawyers, these documents tell you, ‘This the information we’re collecting, this is how we’re processing it, this […]

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Fake news detector algorithm works better than a human

System sniffs out fakes up to 76 percent of the time.

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Detecting Huntington’s disease with an algorithm that analyzes speech

New, preliminary research found automated speech test accurately diagnoses Huntington’s disease 81 percent of the time and tracks the disease’s progression.

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A new company, Omniscent, is sniffing out dangerous levels of toxic chemicals in the air

Subscription service offers real-time monitoring

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Toyota funds professorship in AI at U-Michigan

The new $2.5 million endowment to support a professorship is the second U-M sponsorship from Toyota

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Online censorship detector aims to make the internet a freer place

Censored Planet could provide new insight into the flow of online information

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‘Air traffic control’ for driverless cars could speed up deployment

Human-generated responses could remotely assist autonomous vehicles decision’s during times of uncertainty.

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Advancing AI for Video: Startup launches powerful video processing platform

Voxel51 uses AI processing to identify and track objects and activities through video clips.

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First programmable memristor computer aims to bring AI processing down from the cloud

Circuit elements that store information in their electrical resistances enable a brain-like form of computing, storing and processing information in the same place.

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How Russia’s online censorship could jeopardize internet freedom worldwide

The nation is using inexpensive commodity equipment to block 170K domains on more than 1K privately-owned ISPs.

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How an AI solution can design new tuberculosis drug regimens

A new method could replace trial and error drug development.

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Deep learning AI discovers surprising new antibiotics

Deep-learning AI will help keep us ahead of drug resistant pathogens. By Sriram Chandrasekaran

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World’s most complex synthetic microparticle outdoes nature’s intricacy

Creating and measuring intricacy in particles that could improve electronics and chemical reactions.

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$5.2M for digital twins of nuclear reactors could bring down nuclear energy costs

Virtual copies of nuclear reactors could enable smarter maintenance for current reactors and more automation for advanced reactors.

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$7.5M MURI to make dynamic AI smarter and safer

Researchers from four U.S. institutions aim to pull the best from control theory and machine learning to build safer mobile, intelligent systems.

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$20M NSF AI-EDGE Institute aims to transform 5G and beyond networks

U-M is a core member of a new NSF-led Institute that is a collaboration between 11 institutions, three government research labs, and four global companies.

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Teaching Machine Learning in ECE

With new courses at the UG and graduate level, ECE is delivering state-of-the-art instruction in machine learning for students in ECE, and across the University

Game theory and the COVID-19 outbreak: Coordinating our interests at individual to national levels

A major defense project pivots to explore how to encourage COVID-safe behavior effectively.

Faster than COVID: a computer model that predicts the disease’s next move

Predictive model could help care providers stay safe, anticipate patient needs.

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Engineering immunity: Profiling COVID-19 immune responses and developing a vaccine

As COVID-19 looks more like a disease of the immune system, a Michigan engineer is working with doctors to look at how immune responses differ between mild and severe cases.

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Web app, dashboard from U-M to inform Michiganders’ return to work

The web tools will help state officials identify potential hotspots as they reopen Michigan to business.

How rod-shaped particles might distract an out-of-control immune response

When white blood cells don’t know when to stop, an injection of rod-shaped particles may draw them away from a site of excessive inflammation.

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Turning faces into thermostats

An autonomous HVAC system could provide more comfort with less energy.

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Hunger and COVID: Fighting pandemic-related food insecurity in Detroit

Public policy and engineering team up to improve food access.

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Wireless sensors for N95 masks could enable easier, more accurate decontamination

“The technology can give users the confidence they deserve when reusing respirators or other PPE.”

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Study suggests method to starve pancreatic cancer cells

Rather than attacking cancer cells directly, new cell-model research probes weaknesses in pancreatic cancer’s interactions with other cells to obtain nutrients needed for tumor growth.

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How big data could optimize COVID-19 testing

Microsoft-supported project to coordinate site locations, supply distribution.

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The science behind campus bus changes during COVID-19

Engineers used smoke machines, physics-based modeling and route optimization algorithms to quantify risk.

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A new look at an inevitable problem: muscle loss in aging

Studies in mice give clues to combatting changes in muscle stem cells.

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U-M spinout Asalyxa Bio developing inflammatory treatment platform, aiding COVID-19 patients

The company’s technology delivers an anti-inflammatory agent directly to overreactive neutrophils, minimizing harm from “cytokine storms.”

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New treatments for deadly lung disease could be revealed by 3D modeling

Traditional 2D research may rule out better treatment options.

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Lab-on-a-chip offers faster means of identifying best plasma donors in COVID fight

University of Michigan collaboration with Hackensack Meridian CDI offers new pathway to identify antibodies.

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Stress test

Amid six months of tumult and chaos, engineering researchers moved quickly and collaboratively with public health officials, producing vital research in the fight against COVID-19.

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Personal cold plasma “air curtain” design for COVID-19 protection moves forward

Medical giant Johnson & Johnson and federal HHS select U-M design with “minimal impact on daily life.”

The post Personal cold plasma “air curtain” design for COVID-19 protection moves forward appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Treating autoimmune disorders with an inhaler, rather than an IV

Research in mice shows efficacy for multiple sclerosis.

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More responsive COVID-19 wastewater test developed

Measuring RNA from SARS-COV-2 allows for more accurate testing than similar methods.

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Light-twisting ‘chiral’ nanotechnology could accelerate drug screening

A new approach makes liquid-crystal-like beacons out of harmful amyloid proteins present in diseases such as Type II diabetes.

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N95 mask disinfection: New evidence on how hospitals can effectively recycle key PPE

First-of-its-kind study examined multiple pathogens, as well as filtration and fit.

The post N95 mask disinfection: New evidence on how hospitals can effectively recycle key PPE appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Coughs create complicated airflows. A new project explores how they spread viruses

U-Michigan and Auburn researchers will use cough simulators, lasers, mannequins, human subjects and computational modeling.

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A resilient campus

How engineers are applying their expertise for future planning.

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New protein engineering method could accelerate the discovery of COVID-19 therapeutics

The method could one day be used to develop nanobodies against other viruses and disease targets as well.

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Michigan researchers get $5.3M to expand COVID-19 wastewater monitoring

“Wastewater-based epidemiology has shown to be a valuable tool to inform public health officials of case levels and infection trends in a community.”

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Carbon fiber brain-implant electrodes show promise in animal study

Material and size designed to give electrodes a chance to operate in the body for years.

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Predicting how well a vaccine will work for you

A conventional approach to HIV vaccination does not induce immune responses in everyone equally, and a new computer model shows why.

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Wastewater to drinking water: EPA grants $1.2M to U-M for virus removal study

In preparation for climate adaptation in water-stressed areas, researchers will assess how well existing treatment systems prepare water for reuse.

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Michigan Engineering group creates model for layering COVID-19 defenses

The model can be used as a tool to inform decision-makers and individuals on relative risks and advantages associated with a layered defense.

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New $13.8M center at U-M will study infectious disease, pandemic preparedness

The multidisciplinary research team ​​will synergize efforts across the University.

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New photonic effect could speed drug development

Twisted semiconductor nanostructures convert red light into the twisted blue light in tiny volumes, which may help develop chiral drugs.

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How well do boosters work? Depends on your genes

Computer modeling links a person’s genes to whether producing more antibodies will help them fight off the disease.

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Twisted vibrations enable quality control for chiral drugs and supplements

Terahertz light creates twisting vibrations in biomolecules such as proteins, confirming whether their compositions and structures are safe and effective.

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Recovery from muscle loss injuries hindered by immune cell conflicts

Studies in mice show how the two of the body’s natural injury responders conflict following traumatic muscle injuries.

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Interdisciplinary study seeks to mitigate transmission of respiratory viral diseases such as flu and COVID-19 in children

Michigan Engineering researchers will help reveal pathways for virus detection and transmission

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Tumors partially destroyed with sound don’t come back, in rats

Technique pioneered at the University of Michigan could improve outcomes for cancer and neurological conditions.

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Nanobiotics: model predicts how nanoparticles interact with proteins

Nano-engineered drugs that stop harmful bacteria and viruses could be on the horizon.

The post Nanobiotics: model predicts how nanoparticles interact with proteins appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

$2.38M to test nano-engineered brain cancer treatment in mice

A protein that crosses the blood-brain barrier carries a drug that kills tumor cells and another that activates the immune system.

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University of Michigan partners on multi-institution planning effort for state’s water future

Work for the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy will develop a policy roadmap to safe, low cost water services.

The post University of Michigan partners on multi-institution planning effort for state’s water future appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Durable coating kills the COVID virus and other germs in minutes

Polyurethane locks in the antimicrobial power of tea tree and cinnamon oils. The new technology could start making public spaces safer within a year.

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Shutting down backup genes leads to cancer remission, in mice

Cancer cells delete DNA when they go to the dark side, so a team of doctors and engineers targeted the “backup plans” running critical cell functions.

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Could a smartwatch identify an infection before you start spreading it?

A wrist-worn device detected disrupted sleep 24 hours before study participants began shedding flu viruses.

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Live public street cams are tracking social distancing

Virtually visit (what should be) desolate intersections around the world during COVID-19.

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Machine learning links material composition and performance in catalysts

Understanding how to design better catalysts could enable sustainable energy tech and make everyday chemicals more environmentally friendly.

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Individual finger control for advanced prostheses demonstrated in primates

An electrode array implanted in the brain predicts finger motions in near real time.

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Augmented reality for testing nuclear components

A new machine learning platform detects and quantifies radiation-induced defects instantaneously and could be extended to interpret other microscopy data.

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Calculating the best shapes for things to come

A new algorithm efficiently determines optimal shapes for structures.

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Update: Augmented reality engineering startup lands $1.1M SBIR grant

University of Michigan to explore inventive uses for the technology, including material science, biology and medicine

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MARLO makes initial attempt at the Wave Field

For now, Grizzle and his graduate students are only attempting the easiest routes, between the grassy two- to three-foot moguls, over smaller undulations that he calls “merely very difficult.”

U-M first in line for new bird-inspired walking robot

Cassie is the first offering from new startup Agility Robotics, and is loosely modeled on the cassowary, a flightless bird similar to an ostrich.

New U-M Robotics Building named in honor of Ford Motor Company gift

The gift will accelerate construction.

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Latest two-legged walking robot arrives at Michigan

Built to handle falls, and with two extra motors in each leg, the new robot will help U-M roboticists take independent robotic walking to a whole new level.

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M-Air autonomous aerial vehicle outdoor lab opens

Michigan Engineering now hosts advanced robotics facilities for land, air, sea, and space.

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Teaching self-driving cars to predict pedestrian movement

Data gleaned from cameras and sensors increases predictive accuracy.

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Roofing drone nails down shingles

Automated drone does work at the same speed as a novice roofer, researcher says.

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What humans want, in an automated car

U-M researchers examined how a person’s perception of safety in an autonomous vehicle was influenced by its “personality” traits.

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‘It’s like you have a hand again’

An ultra-precise mind-controlled prosthetic.

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Stronger, faster, further

Charting a path to powered exoskeletons: A Q&A with Leia Stirling

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Delivery robots help Ann Arbor restaurants weather COVID

U-M startup says robotic food deliveries have quadrupled.

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Lights in the labs – and eyes – of researchers coming back to work

‘Noncritical’ in-person research begins ramping up, with public-health protocols.

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Technology that serves all: a single step could pave the way

Space motor helps make robotic prosthetic leg more comfortable and extends battery life

Getting rid of some gears enabled a free-swinging knee, regenerative braking and brought the noise level down from vacuum cleaner to fridge.

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Powering robots: biomorphic batteries could provide 72 times more energy than stand-alone cells

The researchers compare them to fat deposits in living creatures.

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U-Michigan, Ford open world-class robotics complex

The facility will accelerate the future of advanced and more equitable robotics and mobility.

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Helping robots learn what they can and can’t do in new situations

What should a robot do when it cannot trust the model it was trained on?

The post Helping robots learn what they can and can’t do in new situations appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Faster path planning for rubble-roving robots

Splitting the path into difficult and easy terrain speeds up path planning for robots that use “hands” to maintain balance on uneven ground.

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“Robot assistants” project aims to reinvent construction industry

$2M project aims to partner humans with robots for safer jobsites.

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$1M for open-source first-responder robots

An open-source perception and movement system, to be developed with NSF funding, could enable robots that partner with humans in fires and disaster areas.

The post $1M for open-source first-responder robots appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

$1.7M to build everyday exoskeletons to assist with lifting, walking and climbing stairs

The modular exoskeleton system will help workers and the elderly, boosting ankle, knee and/or hip joints by mounting new motors to off-the-shelf orthotics.

The post $1.7M to build everyday exoskeletons to assist with lifting, walking and climbing stairs appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

U-M, Humotech partner to bring open-source bionic leg to research labs

The partnership will expand the capabilities of other labs, and enable them to conduct high-impact research.

The post U-M, Humotech partner to bring open-source bionic leg to research labs appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Open-source patient model tops industry standard

Tested without needing hospitals to share data, the method for developing the model could speed further improvements in medical prediction tools.

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ECE alum Mihir Sheth receives Young Innovator Award from Innovate UK for making a medical device that weans patients off ventilators quicker

Sheth is the co-founder of Inspiritus Health and has developed a simple to use, non-invasive medical device that keeps patients’ muscles engaged when they are on a ventilator to prevent muscle atrophy.

Immune to hacks: Inoculating deep neural networks to thwart attacks

The adaptive immune system serves as a template for defending neural nets from confusion-sowing attacks.

The post Immune to hacks: Inoculating deep neural networks to thwart attacks appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Graphene-hBN breakthrough to spur new LEDs, quantum computing

Study uncovers first method for producing high-quality, wafer-scale hexagonal boron nitride.

The post Graphene-hBN breakthrough to spur new LEDs, quantum computing appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Emulating impossible “unipolar” laser pulses paves the way for processing quantum information

Quantum materials emit light as though it were only a positive pulse, rather than a positive-negative oscillation.

The post Emulating impossible “unipolar” laser pulses paves the way for processing quantum information appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Solar-powered chemistry uses carbon dioxide and water to make feedstock for fuels, chemicals

Producing synthesis gas, a precursor of a variety of fuels and chemicals, no longer requires natural gas, coal or biomass.

Machine learning begins to understand the human gut

The new computer model accurately predicts the behavior of millions of microbial communities from hundreds of experiments, an advance toward precision medicine.

The post Machine learning begins to understand the human gut appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Toward manufacturing semitransparent solar cells the size of windows

A peel-off patterning technique could enable more fragile organic semiconductors to be manufactured into semitransparent solar panels at scale.

The post Toward manufacturing semitransparent solar cells the size of windows appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Open source platform enables research on privacy-preserving machine learning

Virtual assortment of user devices provides a realistic training environment for distributed machine learning, protects privacy by learning where data lives.

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In the news: Michigan Engineering experts July 18-22

Highlights include The New York Times and National Geographic.

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In the news: Michigan Engineering experts July 25-29

Highlights include CNN and Popular Science.

The post In the news: Michigan Engineering experts July 25-29 appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Next generation neural probe leads to expanded understanding of the brain

The hectoSTAR probe, with 128 stimulating micro-LEDs and 256 recording electrodes integrated in the same neural probe, was designed for some stellar brain mapping projects

The post Next generation neural probe leads to expanded understanding of the brain appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Photosynthesis copycat may improve solar cells

The new approach moves energy efficiently and could reduce energy losses converting light into electricity.

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Walking and slithering aren’t as different as you think

New mathematical model links up slithering with some kinds of swimming and walking, and it could make programming many-legged robots easier.

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Seeing electron movement at fastest speed ever could help unlock next-level quantum computing

New technique could enable processing speeds a million to a billion times faster than today’s computers and spur progress in many-body physics.

The post Seeing electron movement at fastest speed ever could help unlock next-level quantum computing appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Breakthrough in green micro-LEDs for augmented/mixed reality devices

Prof. Zetian Mi’s team are the first to achieve high-performance, highly stable green micro-LEDs with dimensions less than 1 micrometer on silicon, which can support ultrahigh-resolution full-color displays and other applications.

The post Breakthrough in green micro-LEDs for augmented/mixed reality devices appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

U-M celebrates Leinweber Computer Science and Information Building construction

Housing Computer Science and Engineering together with the School of Information will drive advances in information and computing through a convergence of disciplines.

The post U-M celebrates Leinweber Computer Science and Information Building construction appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

Senior hires stand out in an impressive year for faculty hiring

The cohort of 36 new tenured and tenure-track faculty includes 11 faculty hired at the rank of professor or associate professor.

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  • Space Exploration, Commercialization, and Defense