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E-commerce / Supply Chain Automation

Future disruptions in consumer and industrial supply chains could come from pandemics, climate emergencies, or shortages of necessary materials.

How can engineers optimize the interlinked systems necessary to predict demand, schedule shipments, automate manufacturing and deliveries, and create secure methods for data transfer and payment? Logistics and operations have been transformed by the digital age.

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Biomedical Engineering
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Climate & Meteorology
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Data Science
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Electrical Engineering
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Environmental Engineering
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Space Sciences & Engineering

Seeing electron movement at fastest speed ever could help unlock next-level quantum computing

New technique could enable processing speeds a million to a billion times faster than today’s computers and spur progress in many-body physics.

Open source platform enables research on privacy-preserving machine learning

Virtual assortment of user devices provides a realistic training environment for distributed machine learning, protects privacy by learning where data lives.

The post Open source platform enables research on privacy-preserving machine learning appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Machine learning begins to understand the human gut

The new computer model accurately predicts the behavior of millions of microbial communities from hundreds of experiments, an advance toward precision medicine.

Emulating impossible “unipolar” laser pulses paves the way for processing quantum information

Quantum materials emit light as though it were only a positive pulse, rather than a positive-negative oscillation.

Immune to hacks: Inoculating deep neural networks to thwart attacks

The adaptive immune system serves as a template for defending neural nets from confusion-sowing attacks

Open-source patient model tops industry standard

Tested without needing hospitals to share data, the method for developing the model could speed further improvements in medical prediction tools.

The post Open-source patient model tops industry standard appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Helping robots learn what they can and can’t do in new situations

What should a robot do when it cannot trust the model it was trained on?

Delivery robots help Ann Arbor restaurants weather COVID

U-M startup says robotic food deliveries have quadrupled.

The post Delivery robots help Ann Arbor restaurants weather COVID appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Teaching self-driving cars to predict pedestrian movement

Data gleaned from cameras and sensors increases predictive accuracy.

The post Teaching self-driving cars to predict pedestrian movement appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Latest two-legged walking robot arrives at Michigan

Built to handle falls, and with two extra motors in each leg, the new robot will help U-M roboticists take independent robotic walking to a whole new level.

The post Latest two-legged walking robot arrives at Michigan appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Calculating the best shapes for things to come

A new algorithm efficiently determines optimal shapes for structures.

The post Calculating the best shapes for things to come appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Individual finger control for advanced prostheses demonstrated in primates

An electrode array implanted in the brain predicts finger motions in near real time.

The post Individual finger control for advanced prostheses demonstrated in primates appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Live public street cams are tracking social distancing

Virtually visit (what should be) desolate intersections around the world during COVID-19.

The post Live public street cams are tracking social distancing appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Michigan Engineering group creates model for layering COVID-19 defenses

The model can be used as a tool to inform decision-makers and individuals on relative risks and advantages associated with a layered defense.

The post Michigan Engineering group creates model for layering COVID-19 defenses appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Predicting how well a vaccine will work for you

A conventional approach to HIV vaccination does not induce immune responses in everyone equally, and a new computer model shows why.

The post Predicting how well a vaccine will work for you appeared first on Engineering Research News.

How big data could optimize COVID-19 testing

Microsoft-supported project to coordinate site locations, supply distribution.

The post How big data could optimize COVID-19 testing appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Hunger and COVID: Fighting pandemic-related food insecurity in Detroit

Public policy and engineering team up to improve food access.

The post Hunger and COVID: Fighting pandemic-related food insecurity in Detroit appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Faster than COVID: a computer model that predicts the disease’s next move

Predictive model could help care providers stay safe, anticipate patient needs.

Teaching Machine Learning in ECE

With new courses at the UG and graduate level, ECE is delivering state-of-the-art instruction in machine learning for students in ECE, and across the University

$20M NSF AI-EDGE Institute aims to transform 5G and beyond networks

U-M is a core member of a new NSF-led Institute that is a collaboration between 11 institutions, three government research labs, and four global companies.

The post $20M NSF AI-EDGE Institute aims to transform 5G and beyond networks appeared first on Engineering Research News.

$7.5M MURI to make dynamic AI smarter and safer

Researchers from four U.S. institutions aim to pull the best from control theory and machine learning to build safer mobile, intelligent systems.

The post $7.5M MURI to make dynamic AI smarter and safer appeared first on Engineering Research News.

How Russia’s online censorship could jeopardize internet freedom worldwide

The nation is using inexpensive commodity equipment to block 170K domains on more than 1K privately-owned ISPs.

The post How Russia’s online censorship could jeopardize internet freedom worldwide appeared first on Engineering Research News.

First programmable memristor computer aims to bring AI processing down from the cloud

Circuit elements that store information in their electrical resistances enable a brain-like form of computing, storing and processing information in the same place.

The post First programmable memristor computer aims to bring AI processing down from the cloud appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Advancing AI for Video: Startup launches powerful video processing platform

Voxel51 uses AI processing to identify and track objects and activities through video clips.

The post Advancing AI for Video: Startup launches powerful video processing platform appeared first on Engineering Research News.

‘Air traffic control’ for driverless cars could speed up deployment

Human-generated responses could remotely assist autonomous vehicles decision’s during times of uncertainty.

The post ‘Air traffic control’ for driverless cars could speed up deployment appeared first on Engineering Research News.

A new company, Omniscent, is sniffing out dangerous levels of toxic chemicals in the air

Subscription service offers real-time monitoring

The post A new company, Omniscent, is sniffing out dangerous levels of toxic chemicals in the air appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Fake news detector algorithm works better than a human

System sniffs out fakes up to 76 percent of the time.

The post Fake news detector algorithm works better than a human appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Chat tool simplifies tricky online privacy policies

Register for an account on just about any website or download an app to your smartphone and you likely will encounter that pesky, “I certify that I’ve read and understand the privacy policy,” check box. “Typically drafted by lawyers, these documents tell you, ‘This the information we’re collecting, this is how we’re processing it, this […]

The post Chat tool simplifies tricky online privacy policies appeared first on Engineering Research News.

“Learning database” speeds queries from hours to seconds

Verdict can make databases deliver answers more than 200 times faster while maintaining 99 percent accuracy.

The post “Learning database” speeds queries from hours to seconds appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Avian secret: The key to agile bird flight is switching quickly between stable and unstable gliding

The finding could have implications for future agile autonomous aerial vehicles.

The post Avian secret: The key to agile bird flight is switching quickly between stable and unstable gliding appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Opinion: Future aerospace enterprises will demand more advanced modeling and simulation

U-M Aerospace Engineering Professor Venkat Raman advocates for more versatile and powerful modeling tools to meet computational demands of next-generation aircraft design.

The post Opinion: Future aerospace enterprises will demand more advanced modeling and simulation appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Catching nuclear smugglers: fast algorithm could enable cost-effective detectors at borders

The algorithm can pick out weak signals from nuclear weapons materials, hidden in ordinary radiation sources like fertilizer.

The post Catching nuclear smugglers: fast algorithm could enable cost-effective detectors at borders appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Mining soundwaves: Researchers unlock new data in sonar signals

“Acoustic fields are unexpectedly richer in information than is typically thought.”

The post Mining soundwaves: Researchers unlock new data in sonar signals appeared first on Engineering Research News.

In the news: Michigan Engineering experts May 17-21

Highlights include NPR, Popular Science and The Conversation.

The post In the news: Michigan Engineering experts May 17-21 appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Keeping the world connected, without sacrificing privacy

Engineering assistant professor Raed Al Kontar outlines a new paradigm for connected devices.

The post Keeping the world connected, without sacrificing privacy appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Making wind power more predictable: A Q&A with Eunshin Byon

Predictive modeling could help power companies get more consistent output from renewables.

The post Making wind power more predictable: A Q&A with Eunshin Byon appeared first on Engineering Research News.

‘Doomsday Glacier’ may be more stable than initially feared

Study sheds light on the future of the massive Thwaites Glacier.

The post ‘Doomsday Glacier’ may be more stable than initially feared appeared first on Engineering Research News.

A ‘decathlon’ for antibiotics puts them through more realistic testing

Surprise findings could upend the current drug discovery approach for treating one of the most dangerous hospital-borne infections.

The post A ‘decathlon’ for antibiotics puts them through more realistic testing appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Has the Olympics changed how it measures false-starts in track?

A Q&A with a biomechanics expert who has researched reaction times

The post Has the Olympics changed how it measures false-starts in track? appeared first on Engineering Research News.

A shoe-box-sized chemical detector

Powered by a broadband infrared laser, the device can zero in on the ‘spectral fingerprint region’.

Autonomous vehicles can be fooled to ‘see’ nonexistent obstacles

Vehicles that perceive obstacles that aren’t really there could cause traffic accidents.

The post Autonomous vehicles can be fooled to ‘see’ nonexistent obstacles appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Computer vision: Finding the best teaching frame in a video for fake video fightback

The frame in which a human marks out the boundaries of an object makes a huge difference in how well AI software can identify that object through the rest of the video.

The post Computer vision: Finding the best teaching frame in a video for fake video fightback appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Battery-free sensor startup takes aim at industrial efficiency

Part of the team that brought us the world’s smallest computer in 2015 brings the future of computing technology into the present.

$1.8M to develop room temperature, controllable quantum nanomaterials

The project could pave the way for compact quantum computing and communications as well as efficient UV lamps for sterilization and air purification.

Batteryless next-generation cellular devices could empower a more sustainable future

PhD student Trevor Odelberg is looking to enable long range, highly reliable, and low-power cellular IoT devices that one day can run entirely on harvested energy, reducing battery waste and empowering devices to last for decades.

Three members of ECE will represent U-M at the 2021 Rising Stars in EECS Workshop

PhD students Sijia Geng, Bahareh Hadidian, and Nasimeh Heydaribeni will participate in the intensive workshop that brings together outstanding women and gender minorities interested in pursuing academic careers in EECS.

The post Three members of ECE will represent U-M at the 2021 Rising Stars in EECS Workshop appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Election lessons from Michigan

Election security expert J. Alex Halderman dissects Antrim County’s election debacle to help future contests go more smoothly.

The post Election lessons from Michigan appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Quantum tech: Semiconductor “flipped” to insulator above room temp

Discovery could pave the way to high speed, low-energy quantum computing.

Big data, small footprint

How changing the rules of computing could lighten Big Data’s impact on the internet.

The post Big data, small footprint appeared first on Engineering Research News.

A breakthrough for large scale computing

New software finally makes ‘memory disaggregation’ practical.

$1.8M DARPA project aims to protect cars, trucks and spacecraft from hackers

Ironpatch could head off growing danger of security vulnerabilities in vehicle systems.

The post $1.8M DARPA project aims to protect cars, trucks and spacecraft from hackers appeared first on Engineering Research News.

How Let’s Encrypt doubled the percentage of secure websites in four years

A Q&A with J. Alex Halderman, who co-founded the nonprofit organization.

Beyond Moore’s law: $16.7M for advanced computing projects

DARPA’s initiative to reinvigorate the microelectronics industry draws deeply on Michigan Engineering expertise.

The post Beyond Moore’s law: $16.7M for advanced computing projects appeared first on Engineering Research News.

An even smaller world’s smallest ‘computer’

The latest from IBM and now the University of Michigan is redefining what counts as a computer at the microscale.

The post An even smaller world’s smallest ‘computer’ appeared first on Engineering Research News.

New $32M center reimagines how computers are designed

‘You shouldn’t need a Ph.D. to design new computing systems.’

$7.75M for mapping circuits in the brain

A new NSF Tech Hub will put tools to rapidly advance our understanding of the brain into the hands of neuroscientists.

The post $7.75M for mapping circuits in the brain appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Al-Thaddeus Avestruz receives CAREER Award to advance sustainable energy storage

Using retired electric vehicle batteries, the project plans to enable widespread and equitable access to sustainable power and energy through sustainable energy storage.

Using remote sensing to track microplastics in the ocean

Electrical Engineering undergrad Madeline Evans is a key researcher on a project that uses NASA’s Cyclone Global Navigation Satellite System to monitor microplastic pollution that harms marine ecosystems.

Kaleo Roberts receives scholarship from the American Indian Science and Engineering Society

Roberts works to improve remote sensing of soil moisture, which is important for environmental conservation, natural resource management, and agriculture.

Tracking Monarch Butterfly Migration with the World’s Smallest Computer

In a project funded by National Geographic, ECE researchers are teaming up with the department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology to advance our understanding of monarch butterfly migration with the most ambitious iteration of the Michigan Micro Mote yet.

Detecting environmental pollutants with a smaller, portable, fully electric gas chromatograph

Prof. Yogesh Gianchandani and Dr. Yutao Qin received an “Outstanding Paper Award” for their fully electronic micro gas chromatography system.

Tianlin Wang recognized with Towner Prize and Distinguished Leadership Award

The College of Engineering honors ECE PhD candidate Tianlin Wang for his excellent research in remote sensing as well as his leadership and service to the community.

Leung Tsang elected to the National Academy of Engineering

A professor of electrical engineering and computer science is awarded one of engineering’s top honors.

Prof. Kamal Sarabandi welcomes Emperor and Empress of Japan at IGARSS 2019

Predicting future disasters is an important goal of those participating in the IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Symposium

COVE: a tool for advancing progress in computer vision

Centralizing available data in the intelligent systems community through a COmputer Vision Exchange for Data, Annotations and Tools, called COVE.

New understanding of neurons in the hippocampus: they’re all the same

A longstanding collaboration between engineers and neuroscientists leads to new insights into how neurons work in the hippocampus.

Snails carrying the world’s smallest computer help solve mass extinction survivor mystery

The study yields new insights into the survival of a native snail important to Tahitian culture and ecology and to biologists studying evolution, while proving the viability of similar studies of very small animals including insects

Prof. Pei Zhang solemnly swears that he’s up to some good

In a project he calls the “Marauder’s Map,” Prof. Zhang uses machine learning-based data models, physics models, and heuristic models to turn physical structures into sensing devices.

Demba Komma awarded Microsoft Research Ada Lovelace Fellowship for research on IoT localization technologies

Komma, a PhD student, is working to develop robust low powered localization technology for Artificial Intelligence enabled Internet of Things in locations where GPS is limited or blocked.

Designing Synthetic Human Gut Microbiome with AI

Prof. Al Hero was interviewed and gave a presentation about his research using machine learning to improve our understanding of the human gut

Qing Qu receives CAREER award to explore the foundations of machine learning and data science

His research develops computational methods for learning succinct representations from high-dimensional data.

Hun-Seok Kim receives CAREER Award to facilitate Internet of Things connectivity

Kim takes an interdisciplinary approach to tackle challenges in heterogeneous classes of energy-efficient and versatile communication systems.

Machine Learning and Systems: A conversation with 2020 Field Award winners Al Hero and Anders Lindquist

Hero and Lindquist took a few minutes to talk about the impact of machine learning on Signal Processing and Control Systems, and what they plan to do about it

Mingyan Liu, 2018 Distinguished University Innovator, talks about her company and data science commercialization

Mingyan Liu, recipient of the 2018 Distinguished Innovator of the Year award, gave a talk about her startup company and participated on a panel discussing data science commercialiation.

$1.6M toward artificial intelligence for data science

DARPA is trying to build a system that can turn large data sets into models that can make predictions, and U-M is in on the project.

Mingyan Liu: Confessions of a pseudo data scientist

Liu’s most recent research involves online learning, modeling of large-scale internet measurement data, and incentive mechanisms for security games.

Time-varying metamaterials for next generation communication, sensing, and defense systems

With $7.5M MURI grant, Professor Anthony Grbic is developing metamaterials for a new generation of integrated electromagnetic and photonic systems.

Behzad Yektakhah earns paper award for research in seeing through walls

Yektakhah’s system improves on the speed, portability, and accuracy of many commercial models

Anthony England, former NASA astronaut, professor, and dean, retires

England has dedicated more than two decades of his distinguished career helping students reach for the stars to understand more about Earth and other planets.

Beyond Apollo 11: U-M ECE’s role in advancing space exploration

For the 50th anniversary of the Apollo 11 moon landing, U-M ECE takes a look back – and a look forward – to how our professors, students, and alums have made their mark on the field.

Deciphering GPS satellites to see inside hurricanes

To dial in on exact wind speeds, researchers needed to reverse engineering the signals from satellites.

Huanting Huang and the mathematical shape of trees

An award-winning modeling method will help us better understand our natural environment

SMAP Update: A mission to manage water globally

The satellite mission to collect global data of surface soil moisture can help weather forecasting around the world.

Professor Leung Tsang Receives 2018 Van de Hulst Award

Prof. Tsang is a world-renowned expert in the field of theoretical and computational electromagnetics, and in particular microwave remote sensing of the earth.

Student Arun Nagpal develops new ENG 100 section to spotlight space science

UM-SEDS co-President Arun Nagpal develops ENG 100 section to expose freshman to space science and atmospheric sensing.

New funding for high-fidelity nerve mapping research

SPARC awarded $1M to a U-M project developing better nerve mapping.

Sensors from head to toe – Todd Coleman makes measuring health simpler

Prof. Todd Coleman’s group is tackling the challenging problem of getting high-fidelity monitoring to work affordably at home.

The Michigan Probe: Changing the Course of Brain Research

Some believed early Michigan brain researchers were engaging in “science fiction” – until development of an advanced tool for forging breakthroughs proved them wrong.

Injectable computers

With a radio specifically designed to communicate through tissue, researchers from the Electrical and Computer Engineering are adding another level to a computer platform small enough to fit inside a medical grade syringe.

Designing large neural codes for the next generation of communication systems

PhD candidate Mohammad Vahid Jamali won a Best Paper award at IEEE ICC for his work on Product AutoEncoders, which could help shape future generations of wireless networks, IoT, and autonomous systems.

Thomas Ryan awarded SMART Scholarship to support his studies on defense technologies

Ryan is an electrical engineering undergrad interested in military systems and devices.

“Ultra low-power receivers for IoT applications” wins Outstanding Invited Paper

Prof. David Wentzloff’s paper examining the trends and techniques to achieve ultra-low power receivers was honored by the IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference

Channel Coding for Next Generation 5G and Beyond

With the help of two NSF awards totaling $1.7m, Prof. Hessam Mahdavifar is tackling new problems to improve the reliability of communication systems for 5G and beyond.

A high-efficiency GaAs solar cell to power the Internet of Tiny Things

The Michigan Micro Mote gets a new gallium arsenide solar cell for added power and adaptability.

Communicating with the world’s smallest computers

Researchers built the first millimeter-scale transmitter and antenna that can talk Bluetooth Low Energy with ease.

Conducting an orchestra of sensor nodes

Keeping time in the Internet of Things with frequency scaling

The new law that will guide the future of information processing

The law of small numbers could impact the next generation of tools that deal with data.

Hun-Seok Kim receives DARPA Young Faculty Award to advance research in IoT networks

Kim’s research is expected to impact the future design and wireless operation of the next generation of Internet of Things (IoT) devices

Michigan’s millimeter-scale computers featured at ISSCC2017, and in IEEE Spectrum

Professors Blaauw and Sylvester showcase capabilities of tiny computing

Alum startup wins $25,000 at Accelerate Michigan Competition

Movellus Circuits won $25,000 in the University Research Highlight and People’s Choice categories

Joshua Adkins Selected for NSF Graduate Research Fellowship

Adkins plans to continue his graduate studies in electrical engineering and computer science at the University of California Berkeley.

Avish Kosari selected as Barbour Scholar for Research in low-power devices for the Internet of Things

Avish conducts research on ultra-low power and battery-less integrated circuits.

MBus is the missing interconnect for millimeter-scale systems

The M3 is a fully autonomous computing system that acts as a smart sensing system.

Necmiye Ozay receives CAREER award for research in cyber-physical systems

Cyber-physical systems are smart, networked systems with embedded sensors, processors, and actuators that are designed to interact with the physical world.

Googling the physical world

IoT applications are the next wave of computing and the next driving force of the semiconductor industry. The startup PsiKick [now Everactive] is helping shape this future.

3 ECE companies make the Silicon 60 List – again!

Ambiq Micro, Crossbar, Inc., and PsiKick, are leading the way in ultra-low power chip design, pioneering computer memory, and ultra-low power wireless sensor platforms.

Silicon valley entrepreneurs help bring WIMS2 technology to the world

Shahin and Sassan discussed everything from the acquisition trends of small vs. large companies to the importance of building a team with a range of expertise.

Michigan Micro Mote (M3) makes history as the world’s smallest computer

A brief history of what led to the technical feat known as the Michigan Micro Mote, a tiny speck of a computer that does it all.

Nick Yang: Investing in the age of robotics

At the age of 24, Yang sold his company ChinaRen for $35 million.

Scott Hanson receives 2014 Arbor Networks Ph.D. Research Impact Award

Dr. Hanson is the co-founder of a startup semiconductor company that plans to lead the low-power revolution in electronics by powering the Internet of Things.

Student Spotlight: Nathan Roberts – Enabling the Internet of Things

Instead of a battery, the chip Nathan is engineering uses two solar cells that look like they belong on a calculator.

PsiKick startup attracts financing for its Internet of Things technology

The chips’ extreme energy efficiency enables them to be powered without a battery from harvested energy sources like vibration, thermal gradients, and more.

Muhammad Faisal wins business competition with technology critical to the Internet of Things

Movellus Circuits’ product is a patent-pending clock generator technology that is smaller, cheaper, and faster than existing solutions.

Avish Kosari receives Rackham International Student Fellowship

Avish is currently conducting research on ultra-low power radio technology and designing a low-power RF power amplifier.

Making the Internet of Things happen

Wentzloff aims to remove the necessity of a power outlet or even a battery to power miniature sensors.

Making smart dust a reality

This research is expected to have a fundamental and long term impact on a diverse set of applications ranging from energy conservation to health care.

Toward computers that fit on a pen tip: New technologies usher in the millimeter-scale computing era

U-M faculty have developed what is believed to be the first complete millimeter-scale computing system, with applications in radio communication and wireless sensing.

Paving the way for ubiquitous computing

Until now, ubiquitous computing has been hampered by the size of necessary batteries—but Ambiq Micro is changing that, with their energy-efficient micro-controllers.

Millimeter-scale, energy-harvesting sensor system developed

The system could enable new biomedical implants as well as home-, building- and bridge-monitoring devices.

Three ECE students awarded Rackham fellowships

Cheng-Hsun Lu,
Shih-Chi Liao, and Jiale Zhang have been awarded the Rackham International Students Fellowship/Chia-Lun Lo Fellowship.

Fawwaz Ulaby retires after nearly four decades of championing students and excelling at research and leadership

Students say Ulaby, a member of the National Academy of Engineering and recipient of the Edison Medal, is one of the best professors – and people – they’ve ever known.

Autonomous well monitoring solution recognized with a Best Innovators award

The WAND wireless sensor developed in a collaboration between Total, an oil & gas company, and the University of Michigan is revolutionizing well monitoring

Ester Bentley receives NDSEG Fellowship to help the world navigate without GPS

PhD student Ester Bentley designs smaller, better 3D mechanical resonators for use in high-performance gyroscopes to help unmanned systems navigate when GPS signal is jammed or lost.

Zhanni Wu awarded Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship

Wu is working on advanced metasurfaces, which could help next-generation wireless communication, commercial and military radar systems, imaging, and antenna systems.

Electrify goes to Detroit

Electrify hosted its first Detroit Tech Camp at the Michigan Engineering Zone this summer to give Detroit-area students greater access to engage with science, technology, engineering, and mathematics.

Huanting Huang improves accuracy of remote sensing

Huang won the Best Student Paper Award at the IEEE International Conference on Computational Electromagnetics for her work developing better electromagnetic models that calculate microwave interactions with tree and vegetation cover.

Laura Balzano receives ARO Young Investigator Award to improve high-dimensional big data problems

Applications include managing large networked systems, such as sensor networks, power grids, or computer networks.

Jiyue Zhu awarded Wiesnet Medal for improved snow algorithms

An award-winning method will help us better understand how much snow is on the ground.

Solar cells enable self-powered camera

A solar cell combined with a camera sensor collects photons to provide electricity.

Student’s digital art makes the Cube even more interactive

Keenan Rebara hopes to add to the fun of spinning the Cube using his a bit of physics and sensors.

IGARSS Interactive Symposium Paper Award for modeling the world’s forests

The paper outlines a better way to quantify forest structure, which has been successful in two tree species.

Rick Bergman, CEO of Synaptics – giving tech a sense of touch

ECE alum Rick Bergman, CEO of Synaptics, is working to make tomorrow’s technology user friendly, safe, and reliable. The company hopes to lead what they call “the human interface revolution.”

Kamal Sarabandi elected Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science

The AAAS seeks to advance science, engineering, and innovation throughout the world for the benefit of all people.

A new, low-cost way to monitor snow and ice thickness to evaluate environmental change

Mohammad has developed a new way to remotely measure the thickness of ice and snow with a technology he calls wideband autocorrelation radiometry (WiBAR).

Injectable computers can broadcast from inside the body

This platform has enabled a variety of sensors that can fit inside the human body, made possible by several breakthroughs in ultra-low power computing.

Alfred O. Hero, III named John H. Holland Distinguished University Professor of EECS

Hero is honored for his extraordinary accomplishments that have brought distinction to himself, his students, and to the entire University.

Xiang Yin earns Pre-Doc Fellowship for research in cyber-physical systems

Xiang’s research focuses on developing new methods to synthesize different control and sensing strategies in a discrete-event system.

David Blaauw named Kensall D. Wise Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science

Blaauw’s innovations in low-power computing led to development of the Michigan Micro Mote, the world’s smallest computer.

Two ‘U’ researchers receive Distinguished University Innovator Award

The Michigan Daily profiles Professors David Blaauw and Dennis Sylvester, who are this year’s recipients of the 2019 Distinguished University Innovator Award.

Seed-sized U-M computers pumped into oil wells featured at the Houston Museum of Natural Science

Millimeter-sized computers log the temperature and pressure from deep within oil wells.

Leaders in ultra low power cicuits and systems presenting at VLSI Circuits Symposium

All of the research being presented focuses on getting the absolute best performance from the tiniest circuits, sensors, and electronic devices.

Computer scientists employ AI to help address COVID-19 challenges

Five multidisciplinary research teams are working on projects to assist with the coronavirus outbreak and to help find solutions to pressing problems.

Listening to bipolar disorder: smartphone app detects mood swings via voice analysis

Roadmap for teachers: U-M free online learning platform paves the way

K-5 teachers and students throughout Michigan are building thriving learning communities online by using free deeply-digital, standards-aligned curricula and platform developed by the U-M Center for Digital Curricula.

Open-source software helps youth with disabilities develop scheduling independence

The system can add more flexibility to task management apps to help learning users make informed decisions about their time.

Researchers to use brain scans to understand gender bias in software development

The team will use fMRI to identify some of the underlying processes that occur when a code reviewer weighs in on a piece of software and its author.

Shadows in the Dark Web

Secrets lurk in the dark web, the 95 percent of the internet that most of us can’t see. One U-M professor is bringing some of those secrets to light, making the digital and the real world a little safer.

Google, U-M to build digital tools for Flint water crisis

CSE students and faculty will collaborate as a part of a larger team to help respond to the crisis.

Walter Lasecki and collaborators win Best Paper at W4A

The paper explores how automated speech recognition and crowd-sourced human correction and generation of transcripts can be traded off to improve accuracy and latency.

Michael J. Cafarella selected for Sloan Research Fellowship

He has built software systems for information extraction, database integration, and feature engineering and applied these to problems in the social sciences.

Barzan Mozafari receives NSF CAREER Award to improve predictability of database systems

Prof. Mozafari is passionate about building large-scale data-intensive systems that are more scalable, more robust, and more predictable.

Censys enables fast searching of actionable internet data

The software enables users to ask questions about the hosts and networks that compose the Internet and get an immediate reply.

Michigan Researchers Win Best Paper Award at VLDB 2015

The paper proposes an interactive natural language interface for relational databases, which enables novice users to construct complex queries.

Third Annual Data Mining Workshop Brings Together 100+ Researchers

100+ researchers from across the University of Michigan and from industry gathered on North Campus for the third U-M Workshop on Data Mining.

Jesse Codling wins Best Presentation award for sensors that help protect these little piggies in their pens

Known affectionately as “The Sh*tty Project,” Codling, an ECE PhD student, monitors the vibrations in pig pens to track the health of the piglets and predict when they’re in danger.

Vikram Verma talks the value of engineering and leadership to society as the 2022 ECE Alumni Impact Award winner

Verma credits his distinguished 30-year executive career with leading technology companies, including Savi Technology, Lockheed Martin and 8×8 Inc., to a combination of education, leadership, and luck.

DISCOVER OTHER THEMES

  • Artificial Intelligence

  • Cybersecurity

  • Health and Bio-compatibility

  • Renewables, Environment, and Sustainability

  • Smart Cities / Smart Infrastructure

  • Next Evolution of Socialization

  • Space Exploration, Commercialization, and Defense