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Health and Bio-compatibility

Biology meets technology.

Need an artificial organ that a body won’t reject or an implanted device to deliver life-saving drugs? How about brain-powered prosthetics or personalized predictions about disease risk? Now let’s make these advances available to people living in environments without all the resources of a massive health care infrastructure.

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A shining white beaker containing a fleshy tumor being held up by a pair of silver tweezers in a blue-gloved hand
Biomedical Engineering
A blood sample flows through a small maze-like "labyrinth" device designed to used to help better detect cancer cells.
Chemical Engineering
A smiling female student points to a wall map lit up in bright yellow, orange, and fushia
Climate & Meteorology
A complicated circuitboard rests against a granola bar with "Strong" written on it.
Computer Engineering
A video-game-esque rainbow outline of a room on a laptop screen
Computer Science
Two male researchers discuss their project outside on a sunny day while working on their laptops
Data Science
A woman working on electric machinery with a green glow
Electrical Engineering
A bright light in the center encircled by a vibrant ring of purple with the shadows of people in the background.
Engineering Physics
A professor pours a liquid from a brown glass bottle onto a growing plant in a farmer's field
Environmental Engineering
The reflection of a student in a side mirror of a car with the the outline of a car's speed dial in the background
Industrial & Operations Engineering
A hammer strikes a red-hot metal that glints with light
Materials Science & Engineering
A student spins the bottom level of a giant Rubik's Cube
Mechanical Engineering
An experiment for developing better interplanetary transport glows blue and purple in a metal thruster discharge chamber
Nuclear Engineering & Radiological Sciences
The view of the laboratory room is warped in a convex optical lens
Space Sciences & Engineering
Robotics Tile
Robotics

Senior hires stand out in an impressive year for faculty hiring

The cohort of 36 new tenured and tenure-track faculty includes 11 faculty hired at the rank of professor or associate professor.

The post Senior hires stand out in an impressive year for faculty hiring appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Walking and slithering aren’t as different as you think

New mathematical model links up slithering with some kinds of swimming and walking, and it could make programming many-legged robots easier.

Next generation neural probe leads to expanded understanding of the brain

The hectoSTAR probe, with 128 stimulating micro-LEDs and 256 recording electrodes integrated in the same neural probe, was designed for some stellar brain mapping projects

The post Next generation neural probe leads to expanded understanding of the brain appeared first on Engineering Research News.

In the news: Michigan Engineering experts July 25-29

Highlights include CNN and Popular Science.

The post In the news: Michigan Engineering experts July 25-29 appeared first on Engineering Research News.

In the news: Michigan Engineering experts July 18-22

Highlights include The New York Times and National Geographic.

The post In the news: Michigan Engineering experts July 18-22 appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Machine learning begins to understand the human gut

The new computer model accurately predicts the behavior of millions of microbial communities from hundreds of experiments, an advance toward precision medicine.

ECE alum Mihir Sheth receives Young Innovator Award from Innovate UK for making a medical device that weans patients off ventilators quicker

Sheth is the co-founder of Inspiritus Health and has developed a simple to use, non-invasive medical device that keeps patients’ muscles engaged when they are on a ventilator to prevent muscle atrophy.

Open-source patient model tops industry standard

Tested without needing hospitals to share data, the method for developing the model could speed further improvements in medical prediction tools.

The post Open-source patient model tops industry standard appeared first on Engineering Research News.

U-M, Humotech partner to bring open-source bionic leg to research labs

The partnership will expand the capabilities of other labs, and enable them to conduct high-impact research.

The post U-M, Humotech partner to bring open-source bionic leg to research labs appeared first on Engineering Research News.

$1.7M to build everyday exoskeletons to assist with lifting, walking and climbing stairs

The modular exoskeleton system will help workers and the elderly, boosting ankle, knee and/or hip joints by mounting new motors to off-the-shelf orthotics.

The post $1.7M to build everyday exoskeletons to assist with lifting, walking and climbing stairs appeared first on Engineering Research News.

$1M for open-source first-responder robots

An open-source perception and movement system, to be developed with NSF funding, could enable robots that partner with humans in fires and disaster areas.

The post $1M for open-source first-responder robots appeared first on Engineering Research News.

“Robot assistants” project aims to reinvent construction industry

$2M project aims to partner humans with robots for safer jobsites.

The post “Robot assistants” project aims to reinvent construction industry appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Faster path planning for rubble-roving robots

Splitting the path into difficult and easy terrain speeds up path planning for robots that use “hands” to maintain balance on uneven ground.

The post Faster path planning for rubble-roving robots appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Helping robots learn what they can and can’t do in new situations

What should a robot do when it cannot trust the model it was trained on?

U-Michigan, Ford open world-class robotics complex

The facility will accelerate the future of advanced and more equitable robotics and mobility.

The post U-Michigan, Ford open world-class robotics complex appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Powering robots: biomorphic batteries could provide 72 times more energy than stand-alone cells

The researchers compare them to fat deposits in living creatures.

The post Powering robots: biomorphic batteries could provide 72 times more energy than stand-alone cells appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Space motor helps make robotic prosthetic leg more comfortable and extends battery life

Getting rid of some gears enabled a free-swinging knee, regenerative braking and brought the noise level down from vacuum cleaner to fridge.

The post Space motor helps make robotic prosthetic leg more comfortable and extends battery life appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Technology that serves all: a single step could pave the way

Lights in the labs – and eyes – of researchers coming back to work

‘Noncritical’ in-person research begins ramping up, with public-health protocols.

The post Lights in the labs – and eyes – of researchers coming back to work appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Delivery robots help Ann Arbor restaurants weather COVID

U-M startup says robotic food deliveries have quadrupled.

The post Delivery robots help Ann Arbor restaurants weather COVID appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Stronger, faster, further

Charting a path to powered exoskeletons: A Q&A with Leia Stirling

The post Stronger, faster, further appeared first on Engineering Research News.

‘It’s like you have a hand again’

An ultra-precise mind-controlled prosthetic.

The post ‘It’s like you have a hand again’ appeared first on Engineering Research News.

What humans want, in an automated car

U-M researchers examined how a person’s perception of safety in an autonomous vehicle was influenced by its “personality” traits.

The post What humans want, in an automated car appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Roofing drone nails down shingles

Automated drone does work at the same speed as a novice roofer, researcher says.

The post Roofing drone nails down shingles appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Teaching self-driving cars to predict pedestrian movement

Data gleaned from cameras and sensors increases predictive accuracy.

The post Teaching self-driving cars to predict pedestrian movement appeared first on Engineering Research News.

M-Air autonomous aerial vehicle outdoor lab opens

Michigan Engineering now hosts advanced robotics facilities for land, air, sea, and space.

The post M-Air autonomous aerial vehicle outdoor lab opens appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Latest two-legged walking robot arrives at Michigan

Built to handle falls, and with two extra motors in each leg, the new robot will help U-M roboticists take independent robotic walking to a whole new level.

The post Latest two-legged walking robot arrives at Michigan appeared first on Engineering Research News.

New U-M Robotics Building named in honor of Ford Motor Company gift

The gift will accelerate construction.

The post New U-M Robotics Building named in honor of Ford Motor Company gift appeared first on Engineering Research News.

U-M first in line for new bird-inspired walking robot

Crashworthy biped expected to run faster than an 8-minute mile and conquer the Wave Field.

The post U-M first in line for new bird-inspired walking robot appeared first on Engineering Research News.

MARLO makes initial attempt at the Wave Field

For now, Grizzle and his graduate students are only attempting the easiest routes, between the grassy two- to three-foot moguls, over smaller undulations that he calls “merely very difficult.”

The post MARLO makes initial attempt at the Wave Field appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Could a smartwatch identify an infection before you start spreading it?

A wrist-worn device detected disrupted sleep 24 hours before study participants began shedding flu viruses.

The post Could a smartwatch identify an infection before you start spreading it? appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Shutting down backup genes leads to cancer remission, in mice

Cancer cells delete DNA when they go to the dark side, so a team of doctors and engineers targeted the “backup plans” running critical cell functions.

The post Shutting down backup genes leads to cancer remission, in mice appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Durable coating kills the COVID virus and other germs in minutes

Polyurethane locks in the antimicrobial power of tea tree and cinnamon oils. The new technology could start making public spaces safer within a year.

The post Durable coating kills the COVID virus and other germs in minutes appeared first on Engineering Research News.

University of Michigan partners on multi-institution planning effort for state’s water future

Work for the Michigan Department of Environment, Great Lakes and Energy will develop a policy roadmap to safe, low cost water services.

The post University of Michigan partners on multi-institution planning effort for state’s water future appeared first on Engineering Research News.

$2.38M to test nano-engineered brain cancer treatment in mice

A protein that crosses the blood-brain barrier carries a drug that kills tumor cells and another that activates the immune system.

The post $2.38M to test nano-engineered brain cancer treatment in mice appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Nanobiotics: model predicts how nanoparticles interact with proteins

Nano-engineered drugs that stop harmful bacteria and viruses could be on the horizon.

The post Nanobiotics: model predicts how nanoparticles interact with proteins appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Tumors partially destroyed with sound don’t come back, in rats

Technique pioneered at the University of Michigan could improve outcomes for cancer and neurological conditions.

The post Tumors partially destroyed with sound don’t come back, in rats appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Interdisciplinary study seeks to mitigate transmission of respiratory viral diseases such as flu and COVID-19 in children

Michigan Engineering researchers will help reveal pathways for virus detection and transmission

The post Interdisciplinary study seeks to mitigate transmission of respiratory viral diseases such as flu and COVID-19 in children appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Recovery from muscle loss injuries hindered by immune cell conflicts

Studies in mice show how the two of the body’s natural injury responders conflict following traumatic muscle injuries.

The post Recovery from muscle loss injuries hindered by immune cell conflicts appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Twisted vibrations enable quality control for chiral drugs and supplements

Terahertz light creates twisting vibrations in biomolecules such as proteins, confirming whether their compositions and structures are safe and effective.

The post Twisted vibrations enable quality control for chiral drugs and supplements appeared first on Engineering Research News.

How well do boosters work? Depends on your genes

Computer modeling links a person’s genes to whether producing more antibodies will help them fight off the disease.

The post How well do boosters work? Depends on your genes appeared first on Engineering Research News.

New photonic effect could speed drug development

Twisted semiconductor nanostructures convert red light into the twisted blue light in tiny volumes, which may help develop chiral drugs.

The post New photonic effect could speed drug development appeared first on Engineering Research News.

New $13.8M center at U-M will study infectious disease, pandemic preparedness

The multidisciplinary research team ​​will synergize efforts across the University.

The post New $13.8M center at U-M will study infectious disease, pandemic preparedness appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Michigan Engineering group creates model for layering COVID-19 defenses

The model can be used as a tool to inform decision-makers and individuals on relative risks and advantages associated with a layered defense.

The post Michigan Engineering group creates model for layering COVID-19 defenses appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Wastewater to drinking water: EPA grants $1.2M to U-M for virus removal study

In preparation for climate adaptation in water-stressed areas, researchers will assess how well existing treatment systems prepare water for reuse.

The post Wastewater to drinking water: EPA grants $1.2M to U-M for virus removal study appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Predicting how well a vaccine will work for you

A conventional approach to HIV vaccination does not induce immune responses in everyone equally, and a new computer model shows why.

The post Predicting how well a vaccine will work for you appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Carbon fiber brain-implant electrodes show promise in animal study

Material and size designed to give electrodes a chance to operate in the body for years.

The post Carbon fiber brain-implant electrodes show promise in animal study appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Michigan researchers get $5.3M to expand COVID-19 wastewater monitoring

“Wastewater-based epidemiology has shown to be a valuable tool to inform public health officials of case levels and infection trends in a community.”

The post Michigan researchers get $5.3M to expand COVID-19 wastewater monitoring appeared first on Engineering Research News.

New protein engineering method could accelerate the discovery of COVID-19 therapeutics

The method could one day be used to develop nanobodies against other viruses and disease targets as well.

The post New protein engineering method could accelerate the discovery of COVID-19 therapeutics appeared first on Engineering Research News.

A resilient campus

How engineers are applying their expertise for future planning.

The post A resilient campus appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Coughs create complicated airflows. A new project explores how they spread viruses

U-Michigan and Auburn researchers will use cough simulators, lasers, mannequins, human subjects and computational modeling.

The post Coughs create complicated airflows. A new project explores how they spread viruses appeared first on Engineering Research News.

N95 mask disinfection: New evidence on how hospitals can effectively recycle key PPE

First-of-its-kind study examined multiple pathogens, as well as filtration and fit.

The post N95 mask disinfection: New evidence on how hospitals can effectively recycle key PPE appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Light-twisting ‘chiral’ nanotechnology could accelerate drug screening

A new approach makes liquid-crystal-like beacons out of harmful amyloid proteins present in diseases such as Type II diabetes.

The post Light-twisting ‘chiral’ nanotechnology could accelerate drug screening appeared first on Engineering Research News.

More responsive COVID-19 wastewater test developed

Measuring RNA from SARS-COV-2 allows for more accurate testing than similar methods.

The post More responsive COVID-19 wastewater test developed appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Treating autoimmune disorders with an inhaler, rather than an IV

Research in mice shows efficacy for multiple sclerosis.

The post Treating autoimmune disorders with an inhaler, rather than an IV appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Personal cold plasma “air curtain” design for COVID-19 protection moves forward

Medical giant Johnson & Johnson and federal HHS select U-M design with “minimal impact on daily life.”

The post Personal cold plasma “air curtain” design for COVID-19 protection moves forward appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Stress test

Amid six months of tumult and chaos, engineering researchers moved quickly and collaboratively with public health officials, producing vital research in the fight against COVID-19.

The post Stress test appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Lab-on-a-chip offers faster means of identifying best plasma donors in COVID fight

University of Michigan collaboration with Hackensack Meridian CDI offers new pathway to identify antibodies.

The post Lab-on-a-chip offers faster means of identifying best plasma donors in COVID fight appeared first on Engineering Research News.

New treatments for deadly lung disease could be revealed by 3D modeling

Traditional 2D research may rule out better treatment options.

The post New treatments for deadly lung disease could be revealed by 3D modeling appeared first on Engineering Research News.

U-M spinout Asalyxa Bio developing inflammatory treatment platform, aiding COVID-19 patients

The company’s technology delivers an anti-inflammatory agent directly to overreactive neutrophils, minimizing harm from “cytokine storms.”

The post U-M spinout Asalyxa Bio developing inflammatory treatment platform, aiding COVID-19 patients appeared first on Engineering Research News.

A new look at an inevitable problem: muscle loss in aging

Studies in mice give clues to combatting changes in muscle stem cells.

The post A new look at an inevitable problem: muscle loss in aging appeared first on Engineering Research News.

The science behind campus bus changes during COVID-19

Engineers used smoke machines, physics-based modeling and route optimization algorithms to quantify risk.

The post The science behind campus bus changes during COVID-19 appeared first on Engineering Research News.

How big data could optimize COVID-19 testing

Microsoft-supported project to coordinate site locations, supply distribution.

The post How big data could optimize COVID-19 testing appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Study suggests method to starve pancreatic cancer cells

Rather than attacking cancer cells directly, new cell-model research probes weaknesses in pancreatic cancer’s interactions with other cells to obtain nutrients needed for tumor growth.

The post Study suggests method to starve pancreatic cancer cells appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Wireless sensors for N95 masks could enable easier, more accurate decontamination

“The technology can give users the confidence they deserve when reusing respirators or other PPE.”

Hunger and COVID: Fighting pandemic-related food insecurity in Detroit

Public policy and engineering team up to improve food access.

The post Hunger and COVID: Fighting pandemic-related food insecurity in Detroit appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Turning faces into thermostats

An autonomous HVAC system could provide more comfort with less energy.

The post Turning faces into thermostats appeared first on Engineering Research News.

How rod-shaped particles might distract an out-of-control immune response

When white blood cells don’t know when to stop, an injection of rod-shaped particles may draw them away from a site of excessive inflammation.

The post How rod-shaped particles might distract an out-of-control immune response appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Web app, dashboard from U-M to inform Michiganders’ return to work

The web tools will help state officials identify potential hotspots as they reopen Michigan to business.

Engineering immunity: Profiling COVID-19 immune responses and developing a vaccine

As COVID-19 looks more like a disease of the immune system, a Michigan engineer is working with doctors to look at how immune responses differ between mild and severe cases.

The post Engineering immunity: Profiling COVID-19 immune responses and developing a vaccine appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Faster than COVID: a computer model that predicts the disease’s next move

Predictive model could help care providers stay safe, anticipate patient needs.

Game theory and the COVID-19 outbreak: Coordinating our interests at individual to national levels

A major defense project pivots to explore how to encourage COVID-safe behavior effectively.

How an AI solution can design new tuberculosis drug regimens

A new method could replace trial and error drug development.

The post How an AI solution can design new tuberculosis drug regimens appeared first on Engineering Research News.

How Russia’s online censorship could jeopardize internet freedom worldwide

The nation is using inexpensive commodity equipment to block 170K domains on more than 1K privately-owned ISPs.

The post How Russia’s online censorship could jeopardize internet freedom worldwide appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Online censorship detector aims to make the internet a freer place

Censored Planet could provide new insight into the flow of online information

The post Online censorship detector aims to make the internet a freer place appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Chat tool simplifies tricky online privacy policies

Register for an account on just about any website or download an app to your smartphone and you likely will encounter that pesky, “I certify that I’ve read and understand the privacy policy,” check box. “Typically drafted by lawyers, these documents tell you, ‘This the information we’re collecting, this is how we’re processing it, this […]

The post Chat tool simplifies tricky online privacy policies appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Plasma jet wands could rapidly decontaminate hospital rooms

Room-temperature plasma beams could essentially dissolve away bacteria and viruses.

Catching nuclear smugglers: fast algorithm could enable cost-effective detectors at borders

The algorithm can pick out weak signals from nuclear weapons materials, hidden in ordinary radiation sources like fertilizer.

The post Catching nuclear smugglers: fast algorithm could enable cost-effective detectors at borders appeared first on Engineering Research News.

How precision medicine is improving prostate cancer treatment

New, statistically-derived guidelines could potentially save millions of prostate patients from painful and invasive follow-up treatments.

The post How precision medicine is improving prostate cancer treatment appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Shoe-box size breath-analyzer spots deadly lung disease faster, more accurately than doctors

The device could also be used to detect other diseases such as pneumonia, sepsis, asthma and others associated with lung or systemic blood inflammation.

The post Shoe-box size breath-analyzer spots deadly lung disease faster, more accurately than doctors appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Injectable ‘bone spackling’: A cell therapy approach to heal complex fractures

A Q&A with biomedical engineering professor Jan Stegemann, whose work in mice shows the promise of ‘microtissues.’

The post Injectable ‘bone spackling’: A cell therapy approach to heal complex fractures appeared first on Engineering Research News.

An EpiPen for spinal cord injuries

U-M researchers have designed nanoparticles that intercept immune cells on their way to the spinal cord and redirect them away from the injury.

The post An EpiPen for spinal cord injuries appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Crackling and wheezing are more than just a sign of sickness

Re-thinking what stethoscopes tell us.

The post Crackling and wheezing are more than just a sign of sickness appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Reconstructive surgery tech

Born in an engineering class, now the ‘arterial everter’ has been licensed to Baxter.

The post Reconstructive surgery tech appeared first on Engineering Research News.

A shoe-box-sized chemical detector

Powered by a broadband infrared laser, the device can zero in on the ‘spectral fingerprint region’.

Autonomous vehicles can be fooled to ‘see’ nonexistent obstacles

Vehicles that perceive obstacles that aren’t really there could cause traffic accidents.

The post Autonomous vehicles can be fooled to ‘see’ nonexistent obstacles appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Computer vision: Finding the best teaching frame in a video for fake video fightback

The frame in which a human marks out the boundaries of an object makes a huge difference in how well AI software can identify that object through the rest of the video.

The post Computer vision: Finding the best teaching frame in a video for fake video fightback appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Her fight for your rights

Could censorship end the internet as we know it? Not if Roya Ensafi can help it.

Less nosy smart speakers

Technology could capture household information without recording speech.

The post Less nosy smart speakers appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Election lessons from Michigan

Election security expert J. Alex Halderman dissects Antrim County’s election debacle to help future contests go more smoothly.

The post Election lessons from Michigan appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Burn after reading

A self-erasing chip for security and anti-counterfeit tech.

Kirigami sensor patch for shoulders could improve injury recovery, athletic training

Low-cost sensors could one day enable patients to log exercise and track progress in a smartphone app

The post Kirigami sensor patch for shoulders could improve injury recovery, athletic training appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Kirigami can spin terahertz rays in real time to peer into biological tissue

The rays used by airport scanners might have a future in medical imaging.

$1.8M DARPA project aims to protect cars, trucks and spacecraft from hackers

Ironpatch could head off growing danger of security vulnerabilities in vehicle systems.

The post $1.8M DARPA project aims to protect cars, trucks and spacecraft from hackers appeared first on Engineering Research News.

How Let’s Encrypt doubled the percentage of secure websites in four years

A Q&A with J. Alex Halderman, who co-founded the nonprofit organization.

5 ways Americans can keep their vote secure and accurate

Expert advice for voting in an unprecedented election.

The post 5 ways Americans can keep their vote secure and accurate appeared first on Engineering Research News.

New remote voting risks and solutions identified

The upcoming presidential election in the middle of a pandemic has many jurisdictions exploring new technologies. They’re not secure.

The post New remote voting risks and solutions identified appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Not enough voters detecting ballot errors and potential hacks, study finds

Researchers carried out the first study on voter behavior with electronic assistive devices, found 93% missed incorrect ballots.

The post Not enough voters detecting ballot errors and potential hacks, study finds appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Intel processor vulnerability could put millions of PCs at risk

Patches can provide protection.

The post Intel processor vulnerability could put millions of PCs at risk appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Zuckerberg Capitol Hill testimony: Engineering experts offer comments

U-M profs weigh new business model, European-style regulation

The post Zuckerberg Capitol Hill testimony: Engineering experts offer comments appeared first on Engineering Research News.

‘I hacked an election. So can the Russians.’

Professor Alex Halderman and the New York Times staged a mock election to demonstrate voting machine vulnerability.

The post ‘I hacked an election. So can the Russians.’ appeared first on Engineering Research News.

CSE PhD student Matt Bernhard on the Facebook data breach

In this video, CSE PhD Student Matt Bernhard weighs in on the matter Facebook data harvesting, such as that done by Cambridge Analytica.

The post CSE PhD student Matt Bernhard on the Facebook data breach appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Cuba ‘sonic attacks’: A covert accident?

‘We’ve demonstrated a scenario in which the harm might have been unintentional.’

The post Cuba ‘sonic attacks’: A covert accident? appeared first on Engineering Research News.

A 3D camera for safer autonomy and advanced biomedical imaging

Researchers demonstrated the use of stacked, transparent graphene photodetectors combined with image processing algorithms to produce 3D images and range detection.

The post A 3D camera for safer autonomy and advanced biomedical imaging appeared first on Engineering Research News.

$7.75M for mapping circuits in the brain

A new NSF Tech Hub will put tools to rapidly advance our understanding of the brain into the hands of neuroscientists.

The post $7.75M for mapping circuits in the brain appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Prof. Louise Willingale creates extreme plasma conditions using high-intensity laser pulses

Willingale’s research in plasma physics advances many research areas from spectacular astrophysical phenomena to cancer treatment to fusion power.

3D motion tracking system could streamline vision for autonomous tech

Transparent optical sensor arrays combine with a specialized neural network in new University of Michigan prototype

Prof. Euisik Yoon named IEEE Fellow for groundbreaking research in Bio-MEMS

Yoon’s research has contributed to a better understanding of the brain, as well as improved detection and treatment of cancer.

Designing Synthetic Human Gut Microbiome with AI

Prof. Al Hero was interviewed and gave a presentation about his research using machine learning to improve our understanding of the human gut

Embracing Risk: Cyber insurance as an incentive mechanism for cybersecurity

This new book by Mingyan Liu offers an engineering and strategic approach to improving cybersecurity through cyber insurance

First IFIP Workshop on Intelligent Vehicle Dependability and Security

The workshop, co-organized by a team including two EECS faculty, focused on ensuring the safety of Level 3 autonomous vehicles, where humans must be ready to take over control.

Xueru Zhang awarded Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship

Zhang is working to improve data security and address important ethical issues related to AI and discriminatory data sets.

Time-varying metamaterials for next generation communication, sensing, and defense systems

With $7.5M MURI grant, Professor Anthony Grbic is developing metamaterials for a new generation of integrated electromagnetic and photonic systems.

Behzad Yektakhah earns paper award for research in seeing through walls

Yektakhah’s system improves on the speed, portability, and accuracy of many commercial models

Two Michigan papers win top awards at IEEE Security and Privacy Symposium

One of the paper describes and demonstrates a malicious hardware backdoor. The other demonstrated security failings in a commercial smart home platform.

Thomas Chen earns NSF Graduate Research Fellowship for research in artificial neural networks for computer vision

Thomas and his group are working to improve upon artificial neural network design through a process called sparse coding.

Yi-Chin Wu receives ProQuest Distinguished Dissertation Award for research in network security

Her dissertation focused on “opacity,” which captures whether a given secret of the system can be inferred by intruders who observe the behavior of the system.

Yelin Kim wins Best Student Paper Award at ACM Multimedia 2014 for research in facial emotion recognition

She computationally measures, represents, and analyzes human behavior data to illuminate fundamental human behavior and emotion perception, and develop natural human-machine interfaces.

Prof. Kamal Sarabandi elected President of IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society

The IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Society is a remote sensing organization with more than 3700 members around the globe.

Prof. Becky Peterson awarded DARPA Young Faculty Award to investigate new materials for power semiconductor devices

Peterson’s findings could be used in wireless sensing and actuation systems, including those that deal with monitoring of the environment and medical conditions.

Prof. Pallab Bhattacharya to receive 2015 IEEE David Sarnoff Award

Since coming to the University in 1984, Bhattacharya has pioneered several important technological advances.

Shrinking the size of optical systems, exponentially

The researchers believe that metasurfaces could one day be used to completely control the phase, amplitude, and polarization of light.

When GPS fails, this speck of an electronic device could step in

The research group developed special fabrication processes that allows them to stack and bond seven different devices in layers.

New laser shows what substances are made of; could be new eyes for military

By shining the laser on a target and analyzing the reflected light, researchers can tell the chemical composition of the target.

After Newtown: A new use for a weapons-detecting radar?

The technology could potentially identify a hidden weapon from a distance in less than a second.

James McCullagh receives Best Student Paper Award for research to keep bridges safe

McCullagh is working to develop energy harvesting devices and circuits to power wireless sensor nodes which can monitor bridge health.

‘Perfect black’ coating can render a 3D object flat, raises intriguing dark veil possibility in astronomy

The carbon nanotube carpet is about half the thickness of a sheet of paper and absorbs 99.9 percent of the light that hits it.

2018 Nobel Prize Laureate Gérard Mourou talks high-intensity optics

Gérard Mourou, Professor Emeritus of EECS, returned to campus to discuss winning the Nobel Prize and his work in high-intensity optics.

Extreme light: Nobel laureate discusses the past & future of lasers

Lasers of tomorrow might neutralize nuclear waste, clean up space junk and advance proton therapy to treat cancer, says Gerard Mourou.

A view into what’s really happening during gene editing for Precision CRISPR

Prof. Somin Lee and her research group developed a way to reduce trial and error in gene editing by getting a look at the process in real time

High Efficiency Ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes to sterilize pathogens, including COVID-19

Research led by Prof. Zetian Mi has been honored with the 2020 Editor-in-Chief Choice Award from “Photonics Research.”

Touchless respiratory and heart rate measurement for COVID-19 health screening

New technology provides a contactless method to add respiratory rate and heart rate to temperature readings .

Research to improve medical imaging of the brain receives Magna cum Laude Merit award

The interdisciplinary team was able to dramatically speed up the process while potentially doubling the quality of the image

Magna cum Laude Merit Award for research to detect the progress of diseases such as multiple sclerosis

The researchers’ imaging technique is fast, accurate, and reproducible

Research on neural probe that sheds multicolor light on the complexities of the brain recognized for its impact

Prof. Euisik Yoon and his team are recognized for their work designing low-noise, multisite/multicolor optoelectrodes that will help neurologists learn more about neural connectivity in the brain.

Melissa Haskell receives NIH Fellowship for research to improve brain imaging

ECE postdoc Melissa Haskell works on improving functional magnetic resonance imaging so we can better measure and understand brain activity.

Improving cancer and disease treatments by understanding electromagnetic communication among biological cells

Prof. Kamal Sarabandi and ECE PhD student Navid Barani won a best paper award for their research on how biological cells may use electromagnetic signal transmission to communicate.

Tracking COVID-19 spread faster, and more accurately

A new application for an ongoing NSF project could bolster contract tracing efforts.

New machine learning method improves testing of stem-like tumor cells for breast cancer research

To improve the prediction and identification of stem-like cancer cells, Prof. Euisik Yoon’s group developed a method that is 3.5 times faster than the standard approach.

Improved neural probe can pose precise questions without losing parts of the answers

It will now be possible to study brain activity when timing is important, such as the consolidation of memory.

Guidance on decontaminating face masks: U-M researchers contribute to national effort

Collaborative website launched while U-M researchers continue advanced testing.

Using machine learning to detect disease before symptoms manifest

Prof. Alfred Hero speaks to ECE about his work using data to predict the transmission of infectious disease among people who are pre-symptomatic or asymptomatic and how it relates to COVID-19.

Toward a portable concussion detector that relies on an infrared laser

By looking at tissue oxygen and cell metabolism at the same time, doctors could have a fast and noninvasive way to monitor the health of brain cells.

The post Toward a portable concussion detector that relies on an infrared laser appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Enabling large-scale testing of cancer drugs with machine learning

Prof. Euisik Yoon and his team developed a new machine learning tool that enables large-scale testing of cancer drug effectiveness with microfluidics.

By Cannibalizing Nearby Stromal Stem Cells, Some Breast Cancer Cells Gain Invasion Advantage

Cancer biologists and engineers collaborated on a device that could help predict the likelihood of breast cancer metastasis.

Laura Balzano aims to improve precision medicine as a Fulbright Scholar

Balzano will work with Portuguese researcher Mário Figueiredo to develop new machine learning methods impacting medical diagnosis and treatment.

Blood biopsy: New technique enables detailed genetic analysis of cancer cells

Capturing cancer cells from blood samples offers a non-invasive way to observe whether the cancer is disappearing or whether it is becoming resistant to the treatment.

Unravelling the mysteries of bacterial communication

EECS-ECE PhD student Navid Barani received the IEEE APS Doctoral Research Award for his work modeling how bacteria use electromagnetic waves to communicate, which could lead to medical breakthroughs.

How to color-code nearly invisible nanoparticles

With a bit of metal, nanoparticles shine in colors based on size.

The next medical markets of Collin Rich

An expert health sciences entrepreneur, Rich is ready to repeat success with revolutionary technology.

New funding for high-fidelity nerve mapping research

SPARC awarded $1M to a U-M project developing better nerve mapping.

Bionic heart tissue: U-Michigan part of $20M center

Scar tissue left over from heart attacks creates dead zones that don’t beat. Bioengineered patches could fix that.

The post Bionic heart tissue: U-Michigan part of $20M center appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Seeing through materials

By developing a fast algorithm to map out the paths light takes through yogurt, researchers aim to someday see through skin.

‘Sister cell’ profiling aims to shut down cancer metastasis

Michigan engineers release individual cells from a specially-designed chip using laser pulses.

The post ‘Sister cell’ profiling aims to shut down cancer metastasis appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Gopal Nataraj receives U-M Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship to support high-impact research in medical imaging

Award for outstanding doctoral candidates near the end of their study.

Sensors from head to toe – Todd Coleman makes measuring health simpler

Prof. Todd Coleman’s group is tackling the challenging problem of getting high-fidelity monitoring to work affordably at home.

The Michigan Probe: Changing the Course of Brain Research

Some believed early Michigan brain researchers were engaging in “science fiction” – until development of an advanced tool for forging breakthroughs proved them wrong.

Cancer stem cells: new method analyzes 10,000 cells at once

A new tool for making sense of the cells believed to cause cancer relapses and metastases.

Students seek the secrets of the brain in study abroad program

IPAN sent eight undergraduates to Germany for a month of lab work, learning about the intricacies of the brain.

Leaders in neuroscience look to the future

ICAN bring engineers and neuroscientists together to review the recent advancement in neurotechnology and neuroscience, define the need for next-generation tools, and enhance the translation of technology to the scientific community.

Injectable computers

With a radio specifically designed to communicate through tissue, researchers from the Electrical and Computer Engineering are adding another level to a computer platform small enough to fit inside a medical grade syringe.

Novel collaboration to probe brain activity in unprecedented detail

A pilot program will bring together researchers from different universities to collaborate on advancing research that may lead to a better understanding of the human brain.

Student team works to improve care for premature infants

The device resembles a swaddling hammock and features a heating pad charged by thermoelectrics, allowing users to light candles beneath the cells to generate power.

Volunteers bring M-HEAL solutions to Peru

Each day the students set up a mobile clinic with a doctor from a partner organization, reaching as many 600 community members while in Cusco.

A better 3D camera with clear, graphene light detectors

While 3D films are currently made using multiple cameras to reconstruct each frame, this new type of camera could record in 3D on its own.

Three teams of graduate students awarded prizes for their final projects in Image Processing (EECS 556)

KLA sponsored prizes for three outstanding projects focused on improving image processing for neurosurgery and satellite applications and MRI reconstruction techniques.

Afshari group receives Best Invited Paper award at the 2019 IEEE Custom Integrated Circuits Conference

Terahertz and sub-terahertz imaging can provide superior results in some biomedical imaging, spectroscopy, and water saturation detection.

Students win prizes for improving image processing techniques for liver cancer detection and much more

Students in EECS 556: Image Processing, explore methods to improve image processing in applications such as biomedical imaging and video and image compression

Ushering in the next generation of flat-panel displays and medical imagers

Prof. Kanicki expects breakthroughs in both the flat-panel display and imager industries using his-ITZO TFT technology in the near future.

Students earn prizes for improving image processing techniques in EECS 556 (Winter 2016)

The course covers the theory and application of digital image processing, with applications in biomedical images, time-varying imagery, robotics, and optics.

Amr Ibrahim earns Rackham Pre-Doctoral Fellowship for research in high millimeter wave radar systems

Amr is investigating both the unique advantages and the performance limitations of radar systems operating at 240 GHz in typical outdoor environments.

Jeff Fessler receives Distinguished Faculty Achievement Award

Prof. Fessler has revolutionized medical imaging with groundbreaking mathematical models and algorithms that improve both safety and quality.

Using data science to achieve ultra-low dose CT image reconstruction

Ultra-low dose CT scans that provide superior image quality could not only benefit patients, but they could open up entirely new clinical applications.

Next generation laser plasma accelerator

One of the most promising avenues for achieving new target levels of high peak intensity and high average power in an ultrafast laser system is to turn to fiber lasers.

Fighting lung cancer: Faster image processing for low-radiation CT scans

This advance could be important for fighting lung cancers, as symptoms often appear too late for effective treatment.

T-ray converts light to sound for weapons detection, medical imaging

U-M researchers demonstrated a unique terahertz detector and imaging system that could bridge the terahertz gap.

Hao Sun earns 3 Paper Awards for medical imaging research

Hao’s research is focused on improving the quality of images from magnetic resonance imaging pulse design.

Mai Le receives CoE Distinguished Leadership Award

Mai has served as Community Service Co-chair of the Graduate Society of Women Engineers since arriving at Michigan in 2011.

Student Spotlight: Mai Le – Finding a better way to diagnose breast cancer with MRI

The research group is using statistical signal processing to create crisper images with only 20% of the data required by a traditional MRI scan.

Gopal Nataraj earns Best Paper Award for improving MRI

Nataraj is using big data techniques to transform the field of medical imaging

Gopal Nataraj receives ISA Fellowship to support research that will improve MRIs

Nataraj’s research aims to generate higher-quality and faster MRI images, resulting in improved diagnostics of neurological disorders and autoimmune diseases.

New algorithms and theory for shining light through non-transparent media

Their technique utilizes backscatter analysis to construct “perfectly transmitting” wavefronts.

Research that will lead to sharper photos earns best paper award

The method they developed compares favorably with the best of current techniques, while being faster and easier.

New technology allows CT scans to be done with a fraction of the conventional radiation dose

“We’re excited to be adding Veo to the measures we already have in place to ensure that we get diagnostic images using the lowest amount of radiation possible.”

A smarter way to make ultraviolet light beams

The researchers have optimized an optical resonator to take an infrared signal from relatively cheap telecommunication-compatible lasers and boost it to an ultraviolet beam.

Safer medical imaging with microwaves

The goal of the research is to develop an alternative method to x-ray imaging that is safer and uses nothing stronger than radio frequency waves.

Yong Long receives Best Poster Award for work in medical imaging

Long’s work describes a new algorithm for performing model-based methods in a way that requires less computation yet provides improved image quality.

Eric Tkacyk receives Best Paper Award for research in biomedical optics

Tkaczyk hopes that his technique will be used to further the understanding, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. Congratulations!

Faculty Profile: Emily Mower Provost

Mower Provost talks about getting awards, doing industry research, understanding human behavior – and Star Wars.

Computer scientists employ AI to help address COVID-19 challenges

Five multidisciplinary research teams are working on projects to assist with the coronavirus outbreak and to help find solutions to pressing problems.

Emily Mower Provost named Toyota Faculty Scholar

Her work uses machine learning to measure mood, emotion, and other aspects of human behavior for purposes of providing early or real-time interventions for people in managing their health.

Precision health in the palm of your hand

Recent breakthrough developments in technologies for real-time genome sequencing, analysis, and diagnosis are poised to deliver a new standard of personalized care.

Rackham Predoctoral Fellowship for design of robust, reliable and repairable software systems

Subarno Banerjee uses program analysis to improve software systems’ safety and security.

Z. Morley Mao elected IEEE fellow for contributions to performance and security of internet routing and mobile systems

Prof. Mao and her students have played an important role in understanding the efficiency, security, and performance of a number of mobile systems.

U-M spin-off Agita Labs releases always encrypted computing product

TrustForge, based on U-M research spearheaded by Austin and Bertacco, provides users with the ability to protect data using a process called sequestered encryption

Five ways to keep vaccine cold storage equipment safe from hackers

A medical security expert outlines the risks and how hospitals can protect themselves.

Hacking reality

Microphones that “hear” light; microprocessors that “tell” us secrets; self-driving cars that “see” fake objects; sensors that “feel” the wrong temperature. Our devices are under attack in new, increasingly sophisticated ways. Security researchers at CSE are exploring the limits of hardware and finding new, sobering vulnerabilities in our computers and homes.

After five years, Let’s Encrypt, a non-profit based on tech developed at Michigan, has helped to secure the internet

Today, over 225 million websites are protected by free certificates issued by Let’s Encrypt.

Major side-channel discovery wins NSA contest

The winning paper broke open a new area of investigation in hardware-based data leaks.

Censored Planet: Tracking internet censorship without on-the-ground participation

Censored Planet is releasing technical details for other researchers and for activists.

CSE researchers help organize 10th anniversary workshop on internet freedom

Prof. Roya Ensafi and PhD candidate Reethika Ramesh led organizing efforts for USENIX’s Tenth Workshop on Free and Open Communications on the Internet.

New collaboration promises greater innovation in medical device security

The two organizations will connect their membership and partner networks to work on advancing security for life-saving devices.

IEEE security conference features six accepted papers from CSE researchers

The projects impact voting systems, physical sensors, integrated circuit fabrication, and multiple microarchitectural side-channel vulnerabilities.

Todd Austin Named S. Jack Hu Collegiate Professor of Computer Science and Engineering

Prof. Austin is a creative, outside-the-box thinker who has produced a body of work that has had extraordinary impact in the area of computer architecture.

Real-time monitor tracks the growing use of network filters for censorship

The team says their framework can scalably and semi-automatically monitor the use of filtering technologies for censorship at global scale.

Researchers design new solution to widespread side-channel attacks

The proposal provides a chip-level safeguard against sensitive data being transmitted after it’s accessed.

Researchers take control of Siri, Alexa, and Google Home with lasers

The newly discovered microphone vulnerability allows attackers to remotely inject inaudible and invisible commands into voice assistants using light.

Offensive vehicle security toolbox makes car hacking easier

The new system is designed to save security researchers time and effort spent reverse-engineering the message format of every vehicle they study.

New tool combats evolving internet censorship methods

Technology pioneered by Michigan researchers can circumvent many effective website blocking tools

Year of vulnerability hunting uncovers potential attacks on Intel Chips, RAM

All three of these attacks put users’ privacy at risk, exploiting new routes to sensitive data.

Remote attack on temperature sensors threatens safety in incubators and industry

The researchers demonstrated that an adversary could remotely manipulate the temperature sensor measurements without tampering with the targeted system or triggering automatic temperature alarms.

PET Award for making privacy policies easier to read

The research generated a chatbot to help users sift through important details in privacy policies.

Best paper award for analysis of a decade of malware reports

The research suggests that common blacklist-based prevention systems are ineffective.

Michigan’s new Election Security Commission holds inaugural meeting on U-M Campus

The meeting began the commission’s review and assessment of election security in Michigan.

Halderman co-chairs new commission to protect Michigan votes

The effort seeks to protect the integrity of every vote.

Election security: Halderman recommends actions to ensure integrity of US systems

In congressional testimony, professor urges $370M in federal funding to replace outdated machines.

Facebook Fellowship for research on web privacy, security, and censorship

McDonald works to develop better privacy and security tools for marginalized communities

Study reveals new data on region-specific website blocking practices

A team of researchers unearthed new data on geographic denial of access to web content in a new paper.

A secure future for US elections starts in the classroom

A new special topics course on election cybersecurity gives students an examination of the past, present, and future of US elections.

Tyche: A new permission model to defend against smart home hacks

“The work is an important step towards understanding how to make tradeoffs between usability and security.”

Undocumented immigrants’ privacy at risk online, on phones

When it comes to their smartphones, immigrants struggle to apply instinctive caution, according to a study by a team of University of Michigan researchers.

Building a security standard for a post-quantum future

A large quantum computer could retroactively decrypt almost all internet communication ever recorded.

Michigan researchers discover vulnerabilities in next-generation connected vehicle technology

The vulnerability allows an attacker to manipulate a new intelligent traffic control algorithm and cause severe traffic jams.

Can sound be used as a weapon? 4 questions answered

What happened to people inside the U.S. Embassy in Havana?

Startup founded by U-M assoc. professor gets NSF grant

Healthcare security company Virta Laboratories, Inc. has received a $750,000 grant from the National Science Foundation Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) program.

Students lead the way on State of Michigan web application to help curb the spread of COVID-19

“I don’t think any of us expected a global pandemic at the end of our senior year, let alone being able to work on an application that helps address it.”

CSE faculty funded for three precision health projects

The CSE faculty include Prof. David Fouhey, Prof. Danai Koutra, Prof. Rada Mihalcea, and Research Scientist Veronica Perez-Rosas.

U-M researchers launch fight against C. difficile with $9.2M grant from NIH

Prof. Wiens will continue to use machine learning techniques to study the disease.

Jenna Wiens receives NSF CAREER Award to increase the utility of machine learning in clinical care

Her primary research interests lie at the intersection of machine learning and healthcare.

Expert take: Engineering for the success of humanity

Three Michigan Engineering faculty help to elevate communities and systems through a people-first approach to teaching.

The post Expert take: Engineering for the success of humanity appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Gravity’s impact on bone cells—experiments heading to the International Space Station

Mechanical engineers at the University of Michigan are tackling mysteries of bone density loss in space and on Earth.

The post Gravity’s impact on bone cells—experiments heading to the International Space Station appeared first on Engineering Research News.

Discover Other Themes

  • Artificial Intelligence

  • Cybersecurity

  • E-commerce / Supply Chain Automation

  • Next Evolution of Socialization

  • Smart Cities / Smart Infrastructure

  • Renewables, Environment, and Sustainability

  • Space Exploration, Commercialization, and Defense