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With Slide, student entrepreneurs aim to make contact sharing frictionless
  1. With Slide, student entrepreneurs aim to make contact sharing frictionless

    Built by students and funded by student VCs, the venture marks a new model for launching ideas into ventures.

  2. After five years, Let’s Encrypt, a non-profit based on tech developed at Michigan, has helped to secure the internet

    Today, over 225 million websites are protected by free certificates issued by Let’s Encrypt.

  3. Josh Meyer has built the software that your kids and teachers need

    From his days as an online poker playing undergrad to his current role as a technology developer, Josh has discovered a passion – and built a platform – for online learning.

  4. Undergrad game developers sign video game development deal

    This is the first time that a team from EECS 494 has signed a funded publishing deal.

  5. The Wolverines Behind the Next Generation of Autonomous Vehicles

    The Center for Entrepreneurship profiles a team of EECS students, who are working to develop the next generation of delivery vehicles.

  6. How Let’s Encrypt doubled the percentage of secure websites in four years

    A Q&A with J. Alex Halderman, who co-founded the nonprofit organization.

  7. Five EECS faculty and alumni recognized for business success

    Nominees were selected based on their career accomplishments, impact in their field, and contributions to their community.

  8. Year of growth, experiments for May Mobility

    May Mobility intends to gradually acclimate the public to the experience of autonomous driving.

  9. Advancing AI for Video: Startup launches powerful video processing platform

    Voxel51 uses AI processing to identify and track objects and activities through video clips.

    The post Advancing AI for Video: Startup launches powerful video processing platform appeared first on Engineering Research News.

  10. Taking on the limits of computing power

    By harnessing the power and speed of graphics processing units, a University of Michigan startup can dramatically accelerate gene sequencing, shortening tasks that took multiple days to a single hour.