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New low-cost surgical instrument moves like a surgeon’s hand
  1. New low-cost surgical instrument moves like a surgeon’s hand

    In an era of spiraling healthcare cost concerns, a new $500 surgical instrument developed at the University of Michigan is vying to take the place of a $2 million robot for certain minimally invasive procedures.

    The post New low-cost surgical instrument moves like a surgeon’s hand appeared first on Engineering Research News.

  2. Coating method could improve temporary implants that dissolve in the body

    Very even, pure coatings that promote healing may now be possible for biodegradable sutures and bone screws.

    The post Coating method could improve temporary implants that dissolve in the body appeared first on Engineering Research News.

  3. The beginning of the amniotic sac

    Amnion developed from human stem cells are being studied. Understanding infertility and pregnancy loss are one area being investigated.

    The post The beginning of the amniotic sac appeared first on Engineering Research News.

  4. The Michigan Probe: Changing the Course of Brain Research

    Some believed early Michigan brain researchers were engaging in “science fiction” – until development of an advanced tool for forging breakthroughs proved them wrong.

  5. “Trojan horse” Nanoparticle can halt asthma, allergies

    In an entirely new approach to treating asthma and allergies, a biodegradable nanoparticle acts like a Trojan horse, hiding an allergen in a friendly shell to convince the immune system not to attack it.

    The post “Trojan horse” Nanoparticle can halt asthma, allergies appeared first on Engineering Research News.

  6. Cancer “decoy” shows potential for breast cancer treatment

    A small, implantable device that researchers are calling a cancer “super-attractor” could eventually give doctors an early warning of relapse in breast cancer patients and even slow the disease’s spread to other organs in the body.

    The post Cancer “decoy” shows potential for breast cancer treatment appeared first on Engineering Research News.