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Touching the Sun to protect the Earth
  1. Touching the Sun to protect the Earth

    A Q&A with Justin Kasper on going where no probe has gone before.

    The post Touching the Sun to protect the Earth appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

  2. Part 7: The end of the mission

    The clock on the Parker Solar Probe will start ticking when it runs out of fuel used to make the attitude adjustments necessary to keep the craft’s key components protected behind the heat shield.

    The post Part 7: The end of the mission appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

  3. Part 6: The big send-off

    The power and fuel capacity of the Delta IV, along with an eventual gravity assist from Venus, will get the solar probe velocity down to a point where it can orbit the sun.

    The post Part 6: The big send-off appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

  4. Part 5: Sunblock and instrumentation

    The extreme conditions of the corona are one of the main reasons a solar probe mission like this hasn’t been undertaken before. But Parker features a series of innovations that will allow the probe to get close enough to do what needs to be done.

    The post Part 5: Sunblock and instrumentation appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

  5. Part 4: Using the gravity of Venus to reach the sun

    While NASA never intended for the probe to return to Earth, Venus represents a point of no return.

    The post Part 4: Using the gravity of Venus to reach the sun appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

  6. Part 3: Parker’s record-breaking ride

    The probe will make multiple passes through the corona, utilizing seven gravity assists from Venus to bring its orbits closer and closer to the sun.

    The post Part 3: Parker’s record-breaking ride appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

  7. Part 2: Testing: Simulating the sun on Earth

    A key component of Justin Kasper’s sensory equipment, Parker’s Faraday cup, had to be shown capable of withstanding the heat and light of the journey to the sun. To test it, researchers had to create something new – a homemade sun simulator.

    The post Part 2: Testing: Simulating the sun on Earth appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

  8. Part 1: Why we need an early-warning system for solar ejections

    When strong magnetic fields crop up along the surface of the Sun cause the atmosphere above to twist, the buildup of magnetic energy leads to a sudden release, called a solar flare. When that energy reaches Earth, it has the capacity to wreak havoc.

    The post Part 1: Why we need an early-warning system for solar ejections appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

  9. Student org brings investors to Michigan

    UpRound works with national and local firms to accelerate the entrepreneurial ecosystem of the region.

  10. Making education accessible in rural India

    Through EduTech, CS student Divyansh Sharma is working to deliver free video courses directly to Indian people in need of basic education.