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  1. Five electrical and computer engineering professors named IEEE Fellows

    Fellow is a distinction reserved for select IEEE members whose extraordinary accomplishments in IEEE fields are deemed fitting of this prestigious grade elevation.

    The post Five electrical and computer engineering professors named IEEE Fellows appeared first on Engineering Research News.

  2. In the news: Michigan Engineering experts November 29 – December 3

    Highlights include the BBC.

    The post In the news: Michigan Engineering experts November 29 – December 3 appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

  3. Prof. Heath Hofmann named IEEE Fellow for his impact in the areas of electric machinery and drive systems

    Hofmann’s control technology has been implemented in commercial vehicles, and he works tirelessly to enhance opportunities for underrepresented students.

  4. Prof. Peter Seiler named IEEE Fellow for his impactful contributions to robust control theory

    Seiler’s contributions to Matlab’s Robust Control Toolbox and to the control of vehicle platoons have resulted in major industrial applications.

  5. Prof. Euisik Yoon named IEEE Fellow for groundbreaking research in Bio-MEMS

    Yoon’s research has contributed to a better understanding of the brain, as well as improved detection and treatment of cancer.

  6. Prof. Zetian Mi named IEEE Fellow for his pioneering contributions to III-nitride photonics and clean energy

    Mi’s research is impacting the future of alternative energy, as well as improved methods for water purification and air disinfection.

  7. Egg-carton-style patterning keeps charged nanoparticles in place and suitable for a wide range of applications

    Prof. Jay Guo and his team discovered a scalable way to settle down and precisely arrange micro- and nano-sized particles according to size

    The post Egg-carton-style patterning keeps charged nanoparticles in place and suitable for a wide range of applications appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

  8. Mimicking a human fingertip’s sensitivity and sense of direction for robotic applications

    With the help of 1.6 million GaN nanopillars per sensor, the University of Michigan team was able to provide human-level sensitivity with directionality on a compact, easily manufactured system

    The post Mimicking a human fingertip’s sensitivity and sense of direction for robotic applications appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.

  9. Mimicking a human fingertip’s sensitivity and sense of direction for robotic applications

    With the help of 1.6 million GaN nanopillars per sensor, the University of Michigan team was able to provide human-level sensitivity with directionality on a compact, easily manufactured system

  10. In the news: Michigan Engineering experts November 22-26

    Highlights include Bloomberg.

    The post In the news: Michigan Engineering experts November 22-26 appeared first on Michigan Engineering News.